Plugging loopholes, supporting new CPUs, motherboard BIOS is really important, these are the means to upgrade the BIOS.

When a DIY player is installed, how to select a suitable motherboard is often the most tangled, even if the same chip set, some people are willing to spend three or four thousand to buy a variety of high-end products of faith, some people in line with enough To choose the cheap motherboard with six or seven hundred good principles, these two choices are not right or wrong, but one thing is certain – the motherboard bought at a high price is not a stupid source of money. There are many values, most people focus on cost-effective, but the big brand motherboards tend to have more invisible value. The Minsheng motherboard we recently encountered is an example because we do not support the Ruilong APU and false propaganda. Everyone may notice the motherboard BIOS at this time. Whether it will be updated frequently or the BIOS is not easy to use will directly affect the user experience.
In the various functions and designs of the motherboard, the BIOS is often the most easily overlooked. The motherboard manufacturer’s promotion will focus on the game network card, HiFi sound card, high-speed USB 3.1 and other selling points. Less, in the past few years there is a dual BIOS sales point of sale, but the dual BIOS is now almost standard on the high-end motherboard, so no point selling features, but experienced DOS interface to brush the BIOS of the veterans to the present The BIOS will be more emotional, knowing that more players will pay more attention to the role of the BIOS. Today we will briefly talk about the importance of the motherboard BIOS and how to upgrade these things.
What is the BIOS? Open any book that tells the basic principle of the computer can see the definition of the BIOS – Basic Input Output System basic input output system, it is a firmware program, it can be said that it is one of the bottom of the PC computer program, daily The first step to boot is the BIOS self-test, which can be successfully booted using the BIOS self-test. Whether it is a PC desktop or a laptop, the BIOS is so important that the BIOS can be written into a book. We do not pursue these technical issues. Everyone feels that the BIOS is less effective every time the BIOS is booted. The sense of presence is better, and you can’t wait to press the power button to enter the Windows system for a second, because once the BIOS stops on a certain process, it shows that the computer has a problem, so there is tossing, check the BIOS error code (some motherboards also (There is not necessarily a debug light.) Experienced DIY players will even use BIOS self-testing sounds to determine where the problem lies. What are the two short, two long, one short, and three short, and so on, but now, these traditional DIY technologies are about to lose. The ancestral craftsmanship hasn’t used much, but it’s a pity.
With the advancement of technology, the BIOS is also evolving, and not to mention these basic changes in capacity, the current UIFI BIOS has changed the interface of the traditional BIOS, and it has become more gorgeous. Graphical interface, multi-language languages ​​including Simplified Chinese, fast startup, support for high-definition resolution, and other functions are all common with UEFI. After all, UFEI uses a C language that is much more powerful than assembly language. BIOS chip Manufacturers and motherboard makers can develop more features, so the BIOS of various AMD and Intel motherboards we see now is much more advanced than the simple to shabby text BIOS interface.
Everyone knows that computer systems, upgrade or reinstall a system will feel the system faster, then the motherboard BIOS upgrade What are the benefits? In simple terms, by upgrading the BIOS, we can get the following benefits:
1, support for the latest processor – a few years ago, interface maddening Intel to change the interface every year, make people complain, now much better, only two or three years for an interface, at least two generations of processors to upgrade, and each generation of processing There will also be a variety of SKU models, and the motherboard must support the new processor. Upgrading the BIOS is a must. A few days ago, we encountered the Ming Luan B350 motherboard can not support Ruilong APU is actually this problem, because the BIOS update is not in place, the existing BIOS does not support two new processors Ryzen 5 2400G, Ryzen 3 2200G, it can not be lit System.

2. Increased memory compatibility – Yes, even in the 21st century, one of the most vulnerable places for computers is memory compatibility. As a review editor, I feel deeply touched. Point the system is not on. For motherboard manufacturers, memory compatibility certification is also a complex process. Only constant BIOS upgrades can ensure compatibility with various types of memory.

3, to enhance overclocking performance – for overclockers, this upgrade will be very important, in some overclocking competition, the players may also use the special BIOS provided by the manufacturer, will relax some restrictions on overclocking, help Players improve overclocking potential. Of course, the public version of the BIOS will also enhance overclocking performance, but it is still based on stability.

4, to enhance system stability – this improvement is similar to the daily upgrade of many APP instructions, system stability is relatively metaphysical, the system instability caused by the BIOS (crash, restart, etc.) is rare, mainly with other Compatible with accessories.

5, security upgrade – most people still do not feel this problem, but some time ago Spectre spectre, Meltown meltdown vulnerability, Microsoft, Google, Apple and other software vendors are busy patching, Intel, AMD is also pushing various The purpose of the BIOS microcode upgrade is to block the security vulnerabilities through the BIOS, so the BIOS upgrade also has the function of improving the security, but most of the time this problem is not prominent, after all, the heavy level vulnerabilities are not always there, for individual users. The impact is not great, but it is very important for enterprise users.

The benefits of BIOS upgrades are numerous, especially with the addition of new processor support and improved memory compatibility. Then the problem has come. Since there are so many benefits, how should the motherboard BIOS be upgraded?

How to upgrade the BIOS? The Eight Immortals Cross the Sea
Many players have no sense of the BIOS is an important reason for this product regardless of the setting or upgrade is a certain threshold, simple interface, plain English, difficult to understand the professional terms are so big, brush the BIOS is also cumbersome, need to boot to pure DOS environment, input various instructions to operate, the result is that only a very few players are willing to toss the BIOS. However, now that there are many technological advances, there are many ways to brush the BIOS. Manufacturers have also developed a variety of simple and convenient BIOS upgrade methods with the times. We have introduced the following methods from easy to difficult:

· 0 level of difficulty: Automatic refresh under Windows system

Modern people who are accustomed to the graphical interface don’t even go to DOS to scan the BIOS, and even create a DOS startup environment will not, so the most simple brush the motherboard BIOS is no doubt under the Windows system refresh, which can actually be divided into two In this case, one kind of motherboard manufacturer directly combines the BIOS and the required files for the upgrade into an exe executable file. The user only needs to download the upgrade package corresponding to the motherboard and double-click it to execute it. ASRock provides the BIOS upgrade in this way.

The second update under Windows requires the installation of supporting software from the motherboard manufacturer. The BIOS upgrade tool for the ASUS motherboard is called EZ Update. The operating interface is as follows:

Ez

Asus’s Windows BIOS upgrade tool supports automatic search and manual search. The player who does not know the motherboard model and BIOS model can automatically find the corresponding BIOS and upgrade. The difficulty of upgrading the BIOS is not high.

In addition to ASUS, Gigabyte motherboards also have @BIOS upgrade programs, MSI also has Live Update upgrade software, features similar to the ASUS EZ Update, can download the BIOS and upgrade online, even if the white player to upgrade the BIOS there is no obstacle, this point this The three old motherboard manufacturers deserve praise.

Level 1 Difficulty: Third-party tool refresh under Windows

What if motherboard makers do not provide official tools or executable programs? In this case, if you want to refresh the BIOS under Windows, you have to upgrade the difficulty level. You can only use third-party tools. Current BIOS chip vendors mainly include AMI and AWARD (the other Phoenix was acquired by them). Among them, the BIOS of AMI is the most common and the BIOS tools are the most mature. We use the AMI BIOS as an example and do not know the source of the motherboard BIOS chip. You can use the CPU-Z software to view the “Mainboard” column, which has features that specifically identify the BIOS chip and version.

AMI

The AMI’s BIOS upgrade tool is called AFU (AMI Firmware Update) and is available on multiple versions on the official website. It supports DOS, Windows, and FreeBSD, Linux and other systems. There are multiple versions of this tool. There are many download points for this software, there are also Pacific Download Center, there are many Chinese versions, but just two days before the official version of the version, looks like comes with Simplified Chinese, 5.10 version as shown above. Brushing the BIOS with AFU is not too much trouble, find the ROM file provided by the motherboard manufacturer, click on Open (should be translated into open only) Load the ROM file, select the BIOS option according to the situation, refresh the system after restart OK.

This upgrade is also operating under Windows, compared to the first a little tedious, said third-party tools, its utility is still a tool for the BIOS vendor, in short, these two methods are under Widows operation, for the white More friendly.

Level 2 Difficulty: The motherboard comes with a BIOS upgrade tool to refresh

If the motherboard maker does not provide the possibility of refreshing under Windows? It should be considered under the BIOS to refresh. At this point, we still praised ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, and ASRock. They all provided BIOS refresh tools.

ASUS C6E motherboard BIOS
ASUS motherboard BIOS refresh tool

BIOS
Optional local storage or Internet refresh

This process has nothing to say, just select the downloaded ROM file to automatically refresh, Gigabyte’s Q-Flash, MSI’s M-Flash are all such operations, you can flash the BIOS file in the BIOS interface.

Hell grade difficulty: refresh under DOS

Level 2 difficulty Below is Level 3 difficulty? Wrong, if the first two methods are useless, we can only use the most primitive means to refresh under DOS, this operation is more difficult than the previously described way more trouble – first you want to find a U disk production DOS environment, MS-DOS or FreeDos can be, fortunately, there are a lot of tools you can also create a boot disk, no floppy drive. Completed this step, the following is to set the first boot disk to U disk (now no one should use the drive to boot), enter the DOS environment. To this step, in fact, there are differences in operational difficulty, although some motherboards require DOS environment, but the manufacturers packaged bat batch file, directly execute the batch file will automatically brush the BIOS. If you do not have this, it is the real hell-level brush BIOS mode, you need to execute the BIOS flash utility under DOS, and sometimes specify various parameters, let the BIOS forced refresh to complete, this is very test the level of the players.

As a review editor, the BIOS is rarely used in daily operations in this way. However, it is said that in addition to the several motherboard brands of the Taiwanese brand, the domestic brands of motherboard manufacturers do have BIOS upgrades. Lagging a lot, Windows update tool is not, there is no tool in the BIOS, you need a third-party tool to brush, and the official provided brush BIOS software is really not updated for ten years, does not support 64-bit systems, explain the guide or the XP interface Demonstration. The most unbearable is that they have a low-end motherboard BIOS, and some motherboards do not even provide AFU Windows version, in this respect is quite simple, it is entirely contingent.

Emergency Dafa: You can brush the BIOS without booting

In addition to the conventional brush BIOS approach described above, there is actually a way to emergency brush the BIOS, Asus first introduced a flashing method called USB Flashback on the motherboard, you can notice that some Asus motherboards USB interface is white, This interface supports USB Flashback function. It does not need the CPU, memory or other hardware to brush the BIOS to the motherboard. So once the BIOS has caused the motherboard to hang up, or the unsupported CPU and other unexpected situations, the USB Flashback function brush BIOS can show its talents. .

ASUS C6E motherboard
ASUS motherboard supports USB Flashback brush BIOS function

In addition to Asus, Gigabyte also has Q-Flash Plus, MSI has Flashback+ and other similar functions, but also can brush BIOS to the motherboard without the CPU, the function is similar.

For many veterans, BIOS under DOS is just a basic operation, but as far as the current situation is concerned, this traditional technology is more and more inconsistent with the current trend, expecting a new generation of DIY to go under the boring DOS refresh. BIOS is not feasible, so providing a simple, intelligent BIOS upgrade is also a performance of the motherboard manufacturers, which is also reflected in ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI and other brands higher than the value of domestic brands.

For the player, the idea of ​​many people is that the BIOS will not be upgraded as long as there is no problem. However, the function of the BIOS and the sustainability of the upgrade are still a watershed. You don’t care about this part, but it does not mean it is not important. When you buy a motherboard, don’t just look at the price/performance ratio. The BIOS is also a very important reference factor. The more luxurious the host platform, the more important this issue is.

RepRap professional manufacture

Complementary product prices and freight charges

3D Printer Filament ABS material 1kg

he3d prusa EI3 single 3D printer kit full metal extruder

reprap 3d printer X, Y, Z, E,extruder stepper motor NEMA17

The reprap 3d printer nozzle cleaning special drill

DIY reprap 3d Open source Ciclop 3d scanner kit for 3d printer

The 3D printer reprap dedicated 608 bearings

K200 single head delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

Reprappro Mendel Huxley3D printer pure copper nozzle

10Pcs/lot 100K HE3D NTC 100K Thermistors with cable

Free shipping melzi LCD 12864 To upgrade the LCD

Free shipping Reprap 3d printer Melzi Version 2.0

The reprap 3d printer filament holder

Dual Z axis upgrade set parts for HE3D EI3 3d printer

he3d EI3 triple 3D printer kit-Multi material support

He3D prusa ei3 dual full metal extruder 3d printer kit

2Pcs E3D Kraken Nozzle Throat Fine Finishing Version For 1.75mm

Free shipping Fully Completed Assembly RAMPS1.4 Controller Board

He3D E3D hot end metal extruder for ei3 dual

DIY reprap 3d Open source Ciclop 3d scanner kit for 3d printer

he3d prusa EI3 single 3D printer kit full metal extruder

He3D prusa ei3 dual full metal extruder 3d printer kit

he3d EI3 triple 3D printer kit-Multi material support

K200 single head delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

K200 dual heads delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

K280 the bigger delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

He3D H500 3D printer kit-end stop filament

3d printer dedicated thermistor 100 k

3D printer hot end components in stainless steel connector

s consumables

Formlabs Dental Model Resin 1L (DMBE02)

Formlabs Grey Pro Resin 1L (FLPRGR01)

Formlabs High Temp Resin 1L (HTAM01)

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Dremel 3D20 Idea Builder

Very simple access and start-up so that you can basically start within minutes after unpacking. I checked some tests before and the print quality was cited to be among the best of low-cost entry 3D printers. Well, I tended to use it at least partly to supplement my scale-modelling hobby and soon discovered that neither in 1/35 nor in 1/72 the print quality of figurines is similar would be sufficient to use for modelling. Structures, gadgets etc. work on the other hand very well for dioramas.

The customer service is very good based on my (one) experience where the printer just did not want to print and the step-by-step guide they provided me on a Saturday solved the problem immediately.

The Dremel software is lacking a lot, but Dremel is cooperating with Autodesk and Print Studio supports the Dremel which helps a lot and makes printing a lot easier with that software.

Biggest downside is the frequent need to level the print platform (again this might be always the case, as I have comparison to other printers) and if the level is not within tiny (but achievable) limits, the print will fail.

I use my printer at home and we also have one at work where I demonstrate it building there as well.  Have always had great customer service both from Mitre10 and Bosch.  Love using it and making lots of products with it.  Next step is learning to make and print my own designs

This printer is simple plug and play right out of the box with good build quality. Combine that with a decent size build platform, amazing cusotomer service, and a great price tag and Dremel has done well with this entry level printer. The software that Dremel includes is simple to use and makes the whole interface very nice. I have been using the printer very frequently for over a year with no issues and it shows no signs of slowing down. The only downside is that it is designed to only fit the Dremel brand filament. However, this can be easily overcome by re-routing the plastic tube used for guiding the filament out the back or side of the printer through one of the several vent holes, which conveniently fit the tube perfectly, and then using an external spool mount.

This is my 3rd 3D printer in just 6 weeks. 1 a Flashforge died in the very 1st minute of printing. The 2nd, an XYZprinting DaVinci was terrible. If youre only as good as your slicing software, their software is terrible so I could not print anything other than their sample prints

Dremel software lets me do what I need to do.

Customer service is more than a little dense. No matter what issue I reported, they re-worded the problem completely and made the issue my fault. Got it working soon enough though

Very easy to get going with this printer.  Simple setup, easy leveling.  I use it separated from my computer, have never connected it.  Simply insert a flashcard with models on it, select one and hit print.  That being said, the supplied Dremel slicer software is pretty bare bones, not worth using.  They do however offer a free download of Autodesk Print Studio, which is great, and a must really.  If you need to break up models further then you will need to find a third party software option.  The unit came missing a rubber foot, but customer service was quick to respond and send one out free of charge.  Well pleased with this printer, definitely recommend.

I have a bunch of these in my classroom.  I should state that we have Ultimaker 2s, Dremel 3D20s, Dremel 3D40s and a FormLabs 2.  So, those are my comparisons.  We had a bunch of Makerbot Replicator 2s when I first started here, and after having to take them apart on a daily basis we went with these.  I have over 500 hours of prints on each of these printers, and I just now had to repair one at 770 hours with a build that went crazy.  These printers are very reliable.  I changed the print bed tape that came with it after 250 hours, and it was still going pretty strong.  If you go through Dremel, there is also some education software it comes with too.  I really have nothing bad to say about this except that it is not as easy to level as the 3D40.  It does not have the level of quality as the best print youd find on an Ultimaker 2, and no where near the quality you get out of a SLA printer like the FormLabs 2.  That being said, its cheaper than those models, and it can handle being printed on a daily basis in my classroom.

Ive used a lot of different desktop 3D printers, assembled some professionally, and used a few Dremel 3D20s so I knew what I was getting into when I bought my printer. Its a good value and if you want to print PLA day and night, this is your printer. Ive never had a jam or clog with this machine, ever (knock on wood). I printed out a mod for the extruder, so now I can print flexible material just as easily.

The Dremel build surface is like BuildTak and works very well. The bed is easily removable. I bought a second bed, so I can keep on printing, while Im removing a print. Its pretty quiet. Print quality is very good and squishing the first layer a bit leaves a smooth bottom layer. What I like best about this printer is that its reliable.

The downside… The desktop software isnt the best, but it works great with Simplify3D. Bed leveling can be a little annoying and the acrylic beds arent perfectly flat, I find are a little high in the center.

Note: The CF card attached to the main board always gets unseated when this model printer ships. Youll have to get to the main board, take out the CF cards, remove the hot glue they use to secure the card in the port (I know, crazy) and pop it back in. Should work fine after that.

Overall a great printer and Im very happy with it.

so the dremel idea maker is my first 3d printer so i dont have a vast wealth of knowledge to compare it to. so i opted for this model of the 2 other 3d printers that argos was offering it was more expensive but dremel make great multi tools so i figured it was better to go with a brand i knew of. i was literally printing out of the box within 5 minets the set up was very easy just adjusting the highest three points at was all very self explanatory. it comes with some pre programmed shapes so just selected and away you go. a couple of things to remember the slicing software from dremel exports as there own type of file not an stl file but you can import an stl and once its sliced it exports at there file, i invested in simplify 3d, the main reason for this is that the dremel software is very simple and doesnt give you an option to add support structure which simplify3d does and it exports files in both stl and dremel files. finaly i also had issues with things sticking to the bed (they didnt) i added a sticky sheet which you get a couple of with the printer but things just kept popping off, i uses glue sticks but didnt make much differnace now i use carpet tape !  nothing moves and every print comes out now matter how skinny and tall the object is. it may take a little time to clean the tape off the print plate (i use a sticky stuff remover cleaning liquid which takes it off in seconds) but i rather spend 5 minuets cleaning off a bed than having several hours of prints ruined. all in all i think its a great machine and after talking to people who own different makes of printer Im vey happy with how little trouble i have with this machine

This printer is a good start for beginners.

My only advice if you wanna purchase this 3dprinter: Buy simplify3D  The dremel software is really bad…

Im talking about a second-hand printer (300h print ) repaired by me with parts coming out of service in 10 days. The components are dedicated and I preferred to exchange with the original. Everything was 30% more expensive than any compatible one. If anyone needs details they can do a more complete tutorial. If he had hotbed and self-calibration would be very good. As 3D design software I work with SolidWorks exporting in .stl format. I am from Romania.

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3D Printing vs CNC Explained and Compared

3D printing vs CNC milling: All3DP compares these competing manufacturing technologies and explains which one to use for which purpose.

Note:We are talking about CNC mills and 3D printers in a price range between a few hundred to 3,500 dollars.

CNC millingmachines take a block of solid material (e.g. aluminum or wood) and use sharp rotating tools or cutters to remove all parts that are not needed. So: Milling is a subtractive method in contrast to additive manufacturing as in 3D printing.

CNC mills are computer-controlled. The computer feeds them machine-specific code that controls the cutting tools (just like the G-code used by 3D printers). The models for CNC mills are created using 3D modeling software, so-called CAM (computer-aided manufacturing) software applications. The CNC mills funded through Kickstarter in the last months also accept STL and OBJ files (just like 3D printers), some come with 1-year subscriptions for the CAM software Autocad Fusion 360.

Two examples of CNC mills successfully funded through Kickstarter:

3D printing:There are several types of 3D printers using different technologies and materials. All have in common that they start from scratch and build three-dimensional objects layer by layer (additive manufacturing).

CNC millscan work on a huge variety of materials: metal alloys (e.g. aluminum, steel alloys, brass, copper), softwoods and hardwoods, thermoplastics, acrylic, modeling foams, machining wax (for creating a positive model for casting). You may need different cutting tools for different materials, but the tool-to-machine interfaces are usually standardized so the tools can easily be exchanged.

This way, you can utilize a CNC mill to manufacture prototypes in the same material that will be used for the final product so you can immediately start testing.

Desktop 3D printersare usually restricted to a few materials, typically thermoplastics (PLA, ABS, sometimes nylon) or resins. Thermoplastics can be mixed with other materials such as ceramics, wood, metal, but the workpieces produced on a 3D printer will not be as robust as workpieces cut from a block of metal or wood.

As thermoplastics and resin 3D printers use completely different methods, a resin printer cannot handle thermoplastics and vice versa.

CNC millssuch as the Pocket NC and the Nomad 883 that were funded through Kickstarter, offer positioning accuracies of around 0.001 inch (0.025 mm) and tolerances of 0.005 inch (0.0127 mm). Of course, there are 3D printers such as the Zortrax M200 supporting resolutions of 0.025 mm and the CEL Robox with 0.02 mm. But the material worked on in a CNC mill (e.g. aluminum) allows much higher precision than the FDM used in many 3D printers that tends to deform when exposed to too much heat.

In practice, dull or damaged cutting tools, worn mills or faulty data delivered by the CAM software may result in inaccurate workpieces.

Some3D printers(e.g. CEL Robox, Zortrax M200) promise very high precision but fail to deliver it from time to time. Just take a look at our Common 3D Printing Problems article, and you will find that high precision and FDM 3D printing not always go together. However, not always the technology is to blame: There is a lot a 3D printer user can misdo.

Comparing speed is difficult as CNC mills and 3D printers are typically used for different workpieces and materials. However,3D printingjobs often take hours to complete, whereasCNC millingjobs with comparable size and complexity normally do not take more than an hour.

CNC mills are typically faster when chipping away material from a solid block than 3D printers that build objects layer by layer and occasionally have to slow down to avoid printing problems.

Noise:Depending on the material used,CNC millingcan get extremely noisy. Cutting metal or wood using a large-diameter tool (to quickly remove large parts) can be ear-deafening. The rattling noise from a desktop3D printerwithout casing is like a gentle waft in comparison. When cutting wax models, the noise from a CNC mill is hardly perceptible, however.

Vibrations:When working on a metal or wood block, aCNCmillalso vibrates heavily you wouldnt want to have it on the desktop near you (even if you wore ear defenders to block of the noise). Vibration normally is no issue when 3D printing.

CNC millingmeans cutting away material using a rotating tool. The result: There is a lot of material spurting away, and that may be quite sharp (e.g., splinters of wood or metal). Not all CNC mills are fully enclosed when working on a block of material so things can get quite messy. And with enclosed mills, you have to clean up the mess inside, once the workpiece is finished.

3D printingis not messy by design. When something goes wrong, however, you may need to remove thermoplastics from your printbed. But that is nothing compared to cleaning up after CNC milling.

Some postprocessing may be required both after 3D printing and CNC milling: Grinding and sanding. But we wouldnt call that messy.

By design, there is less waste in3D printingas this technology only requires the material needed for building the workpiece. InCNC millingyou need a block of material that has at minimum the size of the workpiece a lot of material has to be removed and often cannot be recycled.

There is a lot of overlap was far as the range of applications is concerned. Hence, we focus on the applications either technology supports while the other does not.

CNC millingis the better solution when manufacturing workpieces that need to be extremely robust and precise and/or heat-resistant.

3D printinghas more exotic fields of application: It can be used for bioprinting, for printing food, for building purposes, and it can be used in space (e.g. on the ISS or in future space missions).

Thats difficult to compare. But getting started is less costly with 3D printing: You can get decent 3D printers for about $500 (e.g. the Prusa Steel or the Kossel ), while the CNC mills featured on Kickstarter recently start at $2,000.

Hm, thats like asking: lead pencil or ballpoint pen? For some jobs you need a lead pencil while for others the ballpoint pen is the better tool. A 3D printer is the tool of choice for some applications, a CNC mill is the tool of choice for other applications. In an ideal world, an ambitious maker would purchase both a 3D printer and a CNC mill to be able to choose the right tool for the workpiece he intends to produce.

And if the space in your workshop is limited: You can get the best of both worlds.

In May, 630 backers on Kickstarter contributed almost $1.2 million to fund the development und production of a fascinating machine namedBoXZY. BoXZY is a multifunctional machine combining 3D printer, CNC mill and laser cutter/engraver. This multitalent will be available in November.

BoXZY is a robust maker space in a compact aluminum cube that easily fits on a table. It can be turned from CNC mill to 3D printer to laser by simply exchanging tools. Additional tools and attachments can be added. The CNC mill operates at between 10,000 and 30,000rpm. It cuts aluminum, steel alloys, hardwoods, acrylic, thermoplastics (e.g. Delrin), modeling foams (such as Renshape), and machinable wax. The 3D printer uses various kinds of filaments: PLA, ABS, PVA and Nylon.

The BoXZY Loaded will cost $2,900, it combines CNC mill, 3D printer and laser engraver; there is also a BoXZY Pick 2 edition for $1,999 that combines two of the tools (depending on the buyers choice). $3,500 will buy you a BoXZY Supreme, including all 3 tools plus enclosure panels (for trapping heat and debris and blocking laser beams) plus heavy-duty mill and engraving sets and more. All BoXZY boxes come with Autodesk Fusion 360 Ultimate.

We expect more multi-purpose devices in the next future. There had been a Kickstarter project comparable to BoXZY a few weeks ago but it had been withdrawn recently.

Lead image byMichael Schwarzenberger through Pixabay

License: The text of3D Printing vs CNC: Explained and ComparedbyAll3DPis licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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Comparison of 3D printers

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12.5in 8in 10in (320mm 200mm 250mm)

11in 8in 12in (280mm 200mm 300mm)

64mm 40mm 134mm (2.5in 1.6in 5.3in)

150mm 150mm 150mm (5.9in 5.9in 5.9in)

400mm 600mm 800mm (16in 24in 31in)

130mm 96mm 139mm (5.1in 3.8in 5.5in)

152.4mm 153.4mm 152.4mm (6.00in 6.04in 6.00in)

285.4mm 230mm 270.4mm (11.24in 9.06in 10.65in)

43mm 27mm 150mm (1.7in 1.1in 5.9in)

8in 8in 8in (200mm 200mm 200mm)

approximately 2 vertical inches per hour (~100 candies/hr)

610mm 340mm 230mm (24.0in 13.4in 9.1in)

8.5in 11in 17in (220mm 280mm 430mm)

8.5in 11in 7in (220mm 280mm 180mm)

45mm 25mm 100mm (1.77in 0.98in 3.94in)

100mm 75mm 100mm (3.9in 3.0in 3.9in)

125mm 125mm 125mm (4.9in 4.9in 4.9in)

306mm 306mm 306mm (12.0in 12.0in 12.0in)

125mm 125mm 125mm (4.9in 4.9in 4.9in)

298mm 275mm 250mm (11.7in 10.8in 9.8in)

100mm 100mm 130mm (3.9in 3.9in 5.1in)

225mm 145mm 150mm (8.9in 5.7in 5.9in)

Makerbot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer

Makerbot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer

Makerbot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer

Makerbot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printer

100mm 100mm 100mm (3.9in 3.9in 3.9in)

250mm 250mm 265mm (9.8in 9.8in 10.4in)

150mm 150mm 150mm (5.9in 5.9in 5.9in)

150mm 150mm 150mm (5.9in 5.9in 5.9in)

100mm 105mm 130mm (3.9in 4.1in 5.1in)

10in 9in 8in (250mm 230mm 200mm)

152.4mm 152.4mm 101.6mm (6.00in 6.00in 4.00in)

152.4mm 152.4mm 101.6mm (6.00in 6.00in 4.00in)

152.4mm 152.4mm 50.8mm (6.00in 6.00in 2.00in)

152.4mm 152.4mm 50.8mm (6.00in 6.00in 2.00in)

254mm 254mm 305mm (10.0in 10.0in 12.0in)

914mm 610mm 914mm (36.0in 24.0in 36.0in)

127mm 127mm 127mm (5.0in 5.0in 5.0in)

234mm 192mm 148.6mm (9.21in 7.56in 5.85in)

294mm 192mm 148.6mm (11.57in 7.56in 5.85in)

255mm 252mm 200mm (10.0in 9.9in 7.9in)

300mm 200mm 100mm (11.8in 7.9in 3.9in)

StratasysObjet Eden260VS Dental Advantage

260mm 260mm 200mm (10.2in 10.2in 7.9in)

StratasysObjet Eden3500V for Dental

340mm 340mm 200mm (13.4in 13.4in 7.9in)

490mm 390mm 200mm (19.3in 15.4in 7.9in)

490mm 390mm 200mm (19.3in 15.4in 7.9in)

1,000mm 800mm 500mm (39in 31in 20in)

203mm 203mm 152mm (8.0in 8.0in 6.0in)

203mm 203mm 152mm (8.0in 8.0in 6.0in)

210mm 210mm 205mm (8.3in 8.3in 8.1in)

230mm 225mm 205mm (9.1in 8.9in 8.1in)

300mm 200mm 250mm (11.8in 7.9in 9.8in)

200mm 200mm 180mm (7.9in 7.9in 7.1in)

140mm 140mm 140mm (5.5in 5.5in 5.5in)

3D Printer Buying Guide – Airwolf 3D

3D Printers – Compare – 3D Systems.

. Archived fromthe originalon 1 September 2014

3D Printer Overview – 3D Printer Families – EnvisionTEC.

Desktop SLA 3D Printing Technical Specifications Formlabs.

3D Printers for Professional Applications – Stratasys.

Industrial 3D printer – voxeljet solutions

Zortrax M200 3D Printer – Valued by THOUSANDS of users

3D Printers, New – Zortrax Online Store.

Zortrax Inventure 3D Printer – Smart PROFESSIONAL

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Engraver

Owning the Concrete Printer isnt just owning a revolutionary machine but owning a whole new source of income. Our design gives you endless possibilities with wood, glass, soft metals, block ice, and of course concrete!

Conventional methods of engraving require time consuming methods and a large arsenal of specialized tools. The Concrete Printer does it all in a fraction of the time and cost.

We have big plans for our new home here, so we hope youll check back often. New videos, photos, and a ton more will be updated regularly!

The Concrete Printer produces stunning engravings of logos, designs, and fonts in minutes. Our machinecreatesan entirely new business niche on a pre-existing medium found in every corner of the planet. The potential is limitless.

We accept cashiers check, money order, Dwolla and now Paypal.

Dwolla is like Paypal without the fees, saving you money. It takes a few days to verify your account so set yours up now. Receive up to $75 credit when you purchase a machine with Dwolla.

Get the Flash Playerto see the wordTube Media Player.

Concrete Printer CNC Engraver In Action

Watch the CP-8 Concrete Printer CNC Engraver create the Milwaukee Brewers logo on concrete in minutes.

The Concrete Printer is a new CNC engraving machine that turns existing concrete into stunning statements for business and residential areas. Now in a matter of minutes you can engrave an infinite number of logos, patterns, or decorative designs into concrete and even asphalt.

Our CNC router design incorporates a number ofunique featuresthat stand out: The open frame design allows the Concrete Printer to be placed on virtually any surface for engraving, etching, and cutting applications. Additionally, the z-axis incorporates a patent pending floating head system that allows for flawless engraving on UNEVEN concrete and aggregate surfaces in just a single pass.

The Concrete Printer isnt limited to engraving concrete or asphalt. The CP-8 Concrete Printer also fulfills roles as a CNC wood router, CNC glass etching machine, CNC Acrylics and Polycarbonates engraving and cutting tool, block ice sculpting and engraving machine, as well as a CNC mill for cutting and engraving aluminum and soft metals. The Concrete Printer is a truly portable CNC that offers entrepreneurs, college students, construction contractors, and business owners the opportunity to offer a completely new service niche.

The unbelievable uniqueness captures everyones attention and allows owners to reap high margins paying off your investment in weeks, not months or years. Everywhere you look is an untapped market right under your feet Municipal walkways and playgrounds, restaurant patios, factory floors, pool areas, residential stoops, sidewalks and driveways; man caves; business entrances, and more will find your engraving surface too irresistible to pass up the opportunity to make a stunning statement.

Current buyers of the Concrete Printer have billed anywhere from $200 to $1,000 per engraving, and with bits being the only consumable, your profit margins are staggering. The Concrete Printer gives you a service that sells itself. We back you up with solid service and support, as well asmarketing materialsto help your business get off the ground. This is not a franchise and is totally free of any continuing royalty charges.

The Concrete Printer has empowered people all over the United States and Canada with a powerful, own-your-own-business tool that is less than the cost of a used car. Your success is our success. Our machines go quickly and our production capabilities are purposefully limited so give us a call today.

Dremel 3D printer review The Dremel Idea Builder

The Dremel 3D printer branded the Idea Builder is simple to set up and simple to use. It is the closest weve seen to an out-of-the-box plug and play experience. It works well for its intended users casual hobbyists and educators. However, it is limited in terms of print size, materials, and the ability to customize the device, making it a poor choice for those with more advanced needs.

When the Dremel 3D printer branded the Idea Builder was introduced in late 2014, it was the first entry into the 3D printer marketing by a well-known manufacturer. Already trusted in the hobbyist and maker communities for their rotary power tools, 3D printing was a natural extension for the Dremel brand.

Built in partnership with Chinese 3D printer maker FlashForge, the Dremel 3D printer is everything you would expect from a company like Dremel. It is well packaged, well built, intuitive, and works out of the box without a lot of hassle.

The time from unboxing to printing with the Idea Builder is among the fastest weve seen. Simply take the printer out of the box, remove some Styrofoam packing inserts and plug it in. Then load the filament, adhere the built tape to the build platform and level the platform (more on those steps in a moment) and youre ready to go. For most users the process should take no more than thirty minutes.

Click hereto see what others are saying.

The Dremel 3D printer is fully enclosed, which serves two purposes. First, this helps the device maintain a stable temperature during builds, increasing the print quality. Second, it serves as a safety feature, especially important in a school or family environment with young children.

One of the best features of the Idea Builder is the user interface on the device. It is a full color touchscreen with an intuitive menu structure and interface. During a build it displays information about the progress and time remaining.

The build envelope, or maximum size object that can be printed by the device, is on the smaller side at 9 x 5.9 x 5.5. While this should be fine for casual hobbyists and school users, it is important to be aware especially of the 5.5 inch height limitation.

Lets talk about filament. The good news is that loading the filament is easy, especially with help from the aforementioned touchscreen interface. The bad news is that the device only supports PLA, and users are limited to Dremels proprietary filament. It is possible with some effort to modify the device to accept generic PLA brands, but this voids the warranty. For reference, the current price per kilogram of Dremel filament is a little over twice the price of Hatchbox PLA.

The acrylic print bed is also a good news/bad news scenario. Compared to other 3D printers, it is quite easy to level. The device interface guides the user through the process, which is performed with three easily accessible thumbscrews. It can also be easily removed, making it easier to extract your finished part. The bad news is that the print bed is not heated, which can result in reduced print quality due to warping.

The Idea Builder comes with Dremels own 3D software for preparing models for printing. It is easy to use and provides basic functionality such as positioning, rotating and scaling models. For more advanced functionality like adding supports, users will need to download another package such asAutodesk MeshMixer.

The print quality that can be achieved with the Dremel 3D printer is good, but not outstanding. The minimum layer height of 0.1 mm that corresponds to the high resolution setting is par for the course for consumer 3D printers. The lack of a heated print bed as mentioned previously does detract some from the quality, but for the casual hobbyist or educator this shouldnt matter much.

While we didnt encounter any problems with the Dremel 3D printer, some users have reported a tendency for the print head to clog, and others have noted challenges in removing filament. However, most users report that the device is reliable and performs well over time.

One of the best things Dremel brings to the table is the quality of their US-based support. Users have reported that the support team is very responsive and knowledgeable. Dremel products, including filament, are distributed through Home Depot, which may be more convenient for some users as opposed to waiting for items to be shipped.

Dremel hosts an online community forsharing of designsandcommunity support. While the design community has a decent number of interesting models, the community discussion section seems to be inactive. Models can also be used from other communities such asThingiverseandPinshape.

Dremel is known for easy-to-use and useful hobbyist tools. The Idea Builder, their first foray into the 3D printer market, fits well with the Dremel brand. It is among the easiest 3D printers to set up and use, and delivers an outstanding experience for the casual hobbyist or for educators looking to incorporate basic 3D printing skills into their curriculum. It is lacking some features that the more advanced enthusiast would desire, but if you are seeking a no hassle entre into 3D printing then the Dremel Idea Builder should be on your short list.

Dremel 3D printer review: The Dremel Idea Builder

An out-of-the-box, intuitive 3D printing experience for the casual hobbyist

Dremel 3D Printer: The Idea Builder

An out-of-the-box, intuitive 3D printing experience for the casual hobbyist

Dremel 3D40-01 Idea Builder 2.0 3D Printer, Wi-Fi Enabled with Guided Leveling

Quick and easy set-up with Quick Level guided 2-point semi-auto leveling, for fast and accurate calibration

Wi-Fi enabled for remote printing through new Dremel 3D app or through spark software

New Dremel build software and innovative extruder with active filament monitoring protects against failed builds and ensures successful prints

Last update was in: January 25, 2018 8:34 am

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At AxisGeek, we are committed to providing helpful and unbiased information about 3D printing.

How 3D Printing Will Impact The Manufacturing Industry

The implications of emerging technologies such as 3D printing on the industrial manufacturing market are often hotly debated. Some experts in the industry feel that it will be hugely disruptive, while others believe the technology is decades away from viability.

Forecasts project significant growth in the industry over the next five years. As stated by the website On 3D Printing, The 3D printing industry is expected to change nearly every industry it touches, completely disrupting the traditional manufacturing process. As a result, the projected value of the industry is expected to explode in the near future. In fact, On 3D Printing projects that the market for 3D printing technology itself is expected to grow to $5.2 billion by 2020.

As the market grows and the cost of printers falls, it is likely to give rise to new competitors in traditional markets, and spur innovative new products, as prototypes for new products will become significantly less expensive and less risky to fabricate.

Yet product development and the competitive environment are just two of the potential implications. This emerging technology is also likely to have a significant impact on how manufacturers do business, specifically as it relates to shifts in material cost, incremental cost calculations, and traditional assembly line and product pricing strategies.

3D-printing technology has the potential to make the manufacturing process options infinite and extremely precise. For example, today, using whats known as subtractive process, if you want a part made out of aluminum, a block is placed into a CAD system and the excess material is cut away to make the part. Using this process, approximately 60 to 70 percent of the aluminum block ends up as scrap depending on the complexity and shape needed. The scrap is later melted down and reused for future manufacturing needs.

By contrast, 3D-printing technology is additive, and manufacturers are able to use the minimum material needed to fabricate a part. In the example above, using a 3D printer could essentially eliminate the process of melting down excess scrap material and wasted resources, ultimately driving down total material costs for the manufacturer. For the manufacturing industry in general, this could significantly reduce capital tied up in raw materials and costs to reclaim scrap.

Improvement to incremental cost calculations

While the initial cost of a 3D printer could be upwards of a million dollars, the technology has the potential to substantially reduce incremental unit costs for a manufacturer. There is a considerable chance that a part made on a 3D printer could cost far less than one completed through traditional manufacturing processes.

Eventually, the industry may reach a tipping point where the fully allocated costs associated with 3D printing will fall well below the traditional manufacturing process even with the upfront investment in the printers themselves. If thats the case, then it is likely we will see a complete shift in the way industrial manufacturing is done.

Assembly line and pricing strategy transformation

During the manufacturing process, sales teams must work very closely with the production teams to make sure all delivery dates are met and the customer is kept happy from point of sale through production and delivery. In a traditional assembly line process for engineered-to-order products for instance, the tools and material must be changed out for each individual job and reprogrammed for each customer and product. With 3D printing, the production team is given greater flexibility since assembly is a single operation and set up time is reduced to nearly zero. Due to flexibility in this new assembly line process, sales reps would be able to push orders through faster and in a greater capacity, since they are fulfilled almost immediately without waiting for optimal production windows which can accommodate the particular tooling or material used for each order. Additionally, the manufacturing process can be done at a lower cost and every order can be treated like a rush order with shorter production time.

On the other hand, shorter production time and lower overhead costs to the manufacturer doesnt mean that companies will no longer be able to collect value out of a strategic pricing process. Companies may still be able to charge the same price and even enjoy an increased margin rate due to the specificity and uniqueness of products available via 3D-printing processes. Because the manufacturers costs are less, they can decide how much of that cost savings to pass along as a price reduction to customers in order to secure business and keep it out of the hands of competition, or how much to keep in their pockets as increased profits.

For now, the impact of 3D printing on industrial manufacturing is merely theory, but manufacturers who choose to ignore the benefits and transformation associated with this technology risk falling prey to those that embrace it. 3D printing continues to evolve at a rapid pace and each day were seeing something new created from it. What started as fabrication of plastic screws and small parts made of glass has turned into full manufacturing of complete end-products working automobiles and even buildings have been 3D printed in a single manufacturing action. This proves that the possibilities of 3D-printing technology are endless for manufacturers.

Barrett Thompson is the general manager of pricing excellence solutions atZilliant.

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Best low-price 3D printer? – Page 1

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Topic: Best low-price 3D printer? (Read 5132 times)

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Remember, you are unique, just like everybody else

I am thinking about buying a 3D printer that I would use for rapid prototyping small parts prior to CNC machining, and also perhaps for making one-off enclosures for little projects and such.

There are so many out there now, and I have no idea where to start. Can someone give some suggestions on what they have and if they like it? This is something I would probably only use every couple or few months, so I dont want something that needs constant maintenance to work reliably. Id like to spend up to maybe $1,000 or so (is that feasible?).

Its not always the most popular person who gets the job done.

I have heard good things about this, 500 bucks will get you the kit and for an extra 200 you get it built.

but there is a good chance Im wrong.

Why shouldnt we question everything?

Designed by the guy that created Makerslide.

You can get a kit oneBayfor about $500 plus whatever electronics you select, single or duel extruder etc.

QU-BD ( has some very aggressively priced machines that are coming on to the market right now – the first units are being shipped out within the next few days/weeks. They have two extrusion printer models under $1,000 which are very solidly built – all precision milled parts, no lasercut plywood or printed components. QU-BD is claiming extremely fast operating speeds with this design, capable of running in excess of 500 mm/s (they actually found that it runs so fast that the USB/PC interface was usually not keeping up, so SD card is pretty much mandatory).

They also offer a printer+CNC combo (the RPM), which I think is unique in the market. But it also costs a bit more – $1,700. Not quite as fast as the Revolution and Revolution XL printers, due to the heavier gantry needed for milling, but still probably faster than most other printers on the market today.

I have one of the smaller Revolutions on order (am in the beta group), so I will know first-hand what the quality is like. My hopes are pretty high though – the example prints that have been shown look extremely good.

ALL the hobby machines are CRAP. you need to babysit them , parts peel off ,curl up , fall apart … they are not turnkey machines.

the real machines are. put in a cartridge of material hit start and you will get a perfect part. every time.

QuoteThis is something I would probably only use every couple or few months, so I dont want something that needs constant maintenance to work reliably. Id like to spend up to maybe $1,000 or so (is that feasible?).No. you need to babysit these things and futze around with them. A no-touch machine begins at an 30k$ …

Also, the printed objects are not a solid as the real deal. they are good for mockups at best.LoggedProfessional Electron Wrangler.

Any comments, or points of view expressed, are my own and not endorsed , induced or compensated by my employer(s).

Quote from: Corporate666 on April 24, 2013, 01:33:30 PM

There are so many out there now, and I have no idea where to start. Can someone give some suggestions on what they have and if they like it? This is something I would probably only use every couple or few months, so I dont want something that needs constant maintenance to work reliably. Id like to spend up to maybe $1,000 or so (is that feasible?).

There are many out there and quality is improving. IMHO you should be willing to spend around $2000 for something reasonable but I expect prices to drop fast. Ive closely inspected an example of what a cheap 3D printer can do but that wasnt very smooth. Many websites feature all kinds of objects printed by their 3D printer but few show close-ups of the results. Therefore I think the best way to see whether a 3D printer is right for you is to see it in action and inspect the objects it creates yourself.

There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.

Remember, you are unique, just like everybody else

Quote from: free_electron on April 25, 2013, 03:32:38 AM

ALL the hobby machines are CRAP. you need to babysit them , parts peel off ,curl up , fall apart … they are not turnkey machines.

the real machines are. put in a cartridge of material hit start and you will get a perfect part. every time.

QuoteThis is something I would probably only use every couple or few months, so I dont want something that needs constant maintenance to work reliably. Id like to spend up to maybe $1,000 or so (is that feasible?).No. you need to babysit these things and futze around with them. A no-touch machine begins at an 30k$ …

Also, the printed objects are not a solid as the real deal. they are good for mockups at best.

Thank you for this feedback – I think you understand what I am looking for. I have a bunch of CNC milling and lathe machines in the shop right now. As professional machines, they just work. Ive tried to save money on stuff before like pick and places or CNC machines, and the babysitting and compromises required are not acceptable in a business environment where time is money. I was hoping there was a real 3D printer available for a thousand or two, but it seems like thats not the case.

Im keeping an eye on Form Labs new SLA unit, but I guess my pipe dream of a business quality printer in a low price range will remain a pipe dream for now.

Its not always the most popular person who gets the job done.

You are far better off outsourcing this kind of work. Goengineer for example. Or protolabs

All thos plywood and plastic machines are junk. They are good to make litlle saltshakers and figurines. Try to make anything with some reasonable tolerance requirements and it wont work.

The techshop here has three different ones. The old makerbot, the new,all metal makerbot , and an UP!.

None can reliably make two identical parts. Its enough they skip a detent and all is off.

The biiiig problem of all these low end machines is that they have absolutely zero feedback from the gantry and ar table. They run blind , assuming that, if you send 5 pulses to the steppermotor, it takes 5 steps. Well guess what… Even with a 1 part per million error rate , on a large object you may go over a million steps of your stepper motors.. You will have a glitch somewher.

This is something professional equipment dosnt do. Those machines, like you cncs and lathes, have positional feedback. Heck even a 50$ inkjet printer uses positional feedback. There is a paperfeed encoder and a linear encoder for head position. So why dont these plastic-squirters dont use that ?

The answer is simple. Because they are all run by underpowered crapduino based hardware that couldnt cope with the flurry of information that needs to be accounted for. It takes a brain with a substantial amount of processing power to deal with that.

A real motion co troller is a complex piece of hardware and software.LoggedProfessional Electron Wrangler.

Any comments, or points of view expressed, are my own and not endorsed , induced or compensated by my employer(s).

Quote from: free_electron on April 25, 2013, 01:42:57 PM

You are far better off outsourcing this kind of work. Goengineer for example. Or protolabs

All thos plywood and plastic machines are junk. They are good to make litlle saltshakers and figurines. Try to make anything with some reasonable tolerance requirements and it wont work.

The techshop here has three different ones. The old makerbot, the new,all metal makerbot , and an UP!.

None can reliably make two identical parts. Its enough they skip a detent and all is off.

The biiiig problem of all these low end machines is that they have absolutely zero feedback from the gantry and ar table. They run blind , assuming that, if you send 5 pulses to the steppermotor, it takes 5 steps. Well guess what… Even with a 1 part per million error rate , on a large object you may go over a million steps of your stepper motors.. You will have a glitch somewher.

This is something professional equipment dosnt do. Those machines, like you cncs and lathes, have positional feedback. Heck even a 50$ inkjet printer uses positional feedback. There is a paperfeed encoder and a linear encoder for head position. So why dont these plastic-squirters dont use that ?

The answer is simple. Because they are all run by underpowered crapduino based hardware that couldnt cope with the flurry of information that needs to be accounted for. It takes a brain with a substantial amount of processing power to deal with that.

A real motion co troller is a complex piece of hardware and software.

Interesting. Ive run my cnc milling machine for hours at a time and I have never experienced a stepper missing a step and as you correctly point out one step lost is obvious over the rest of the run. I have most definitely seen errors creep in due to wear on the screw threads – obvious when you feel the play, and wear in the linear guides – again obvious.

Certainly real cnc machines use servo motors, they are much more nimble than steppers and can achieve greater speeds, but even they are controlled by rotational and not absolute positional feedback?

Do you have any examples of absolute positional feedback on machines with 3 or more axes of motion, a two axis lathe sounds trivial? Id like to see how how they do it

Remember, you are unique, just like everybody else

Quote from: ecat on April 25, 2013, 02:53:35 PM

Quote from: free_electron on April 25, 2013, 01:42:57 PM

You are far better off outsourcing this kind of work. Goengineer for example. Or protolabs

All thos plywood and plastic machines are junk. They are good to make litlle saltshakers and figurines. Try to make anything with some reasonable tolerance requirements and it wont work.

The techshop here has three different ones. The old makerbot, the new,all metal makerbot , and an UP!.

None can reliably make two identical parts. Its enough they skip a detent and all is off.

The biiiig problem of all these low end machines is that they have absolutely zero feedback from the gantry and ar table. They run blind , assuming that, if you send 5 pulses to the steppermotor, it takes 5 steps. Well guess what… Even with a 1 part per million error rate , on a large object you may go over a million steps of your stepper motors.. You will have a glitch somewher.

This is something professional equipment dosnt do. Those machines, like you cncs and lathes, have positional feedback. Heck even a 50$ inkjet printer uses positional feedback. There is a paperfeed encoder and a linear encoder for head position. So why dont these plastic-squirters dont use that ?

The answer is simple. Because they are all run by underpowered crapduino based hardware that couldnt cope with the flurry of information that needs to be accounted for. It takes a brain with a substantial amount of processing power to deal with that.

A real motion co troller is a complex piece of hardware and software.

Interesting. Ive run my cnc milling machine for hours at a time and I have never experienced a stepper missing a step and as you correctly point out one step lost is obvious over the rest of the run. I have most definitely seen errors creep in due to wear on the screw threads – obvious when you feel the play, and wear in the linear guides – again obvious.

Certainly real cnc machines use servo motors, they are much more nimble than steppers and can achieve greater speeds, but even they are controlled by rotational and not absolute positional feedback?

Do you have any examples of absolute positional feedback on machines with 3 or more axes of motion, a two axis lathe sounds trivial? Id like to see how how they do it

On my CNC machines, the servos are connected directly to the ball screws with an optical encoder on the back of the servo shaft. It is not absolute position feedback, but there is not really much chance to lose a step. Since the motor is mechanically connected to the ballscrew directly (no belt or gears), and the ballscrew is essentially zero backlash, if the motor (and encoder) turn, its pretty much a sure thing that the position changed.

Most NC controls are capable of taking absolute feedback using linear glass scales. Its an option on most lower end machines and sometimes standard on high-end machines made for moldmaking.

I think the problem with the hobby 3D printers is that they are using low powered motors and generally cheap components. I was a bit surprised to see thin wood used as a base for a 3D motion system… all of the flexing of components and tolerances add up to create errors. Thats part of what I liked about the Form Labs SLA machine – since it uses laser scanning,if the laser is fixed, there are less moving axes to go wrong. I would not have minded putting up with 0.010 worth of error, but many of the specs they quote seem like total bullshit.

Its not always the most popular person who gets the job done.

I think that failures often come from to feeble construction. Linear guides have to be PERFECTLY parallel, otherwise the carriage will jam in this place or another. And here you have a missed step.

On top of that, in screw-driven applications where I have like 200steps/rev and 4mm pitch trapezoidal leadscrew, this gives me like 50 steps per milimeter without microstepping (and about 800/mm with microstepping). With 1:1 belt drive you get faster movement, but MUCH worse accuracy.

Say you have a 20mm cog wheel on a stepper. That gives you ~26 steps/mm. Now a single missed step is a big problem.

At 800steps/mm I can live with one or two missed steps.

I love the smell of FR4 in the morning!

Quote from: free_electron on April 25, 2013, 01:42:57 PM

This is something professional equipment dosnt do. Those machines, like you cncs and lathes, have positional feedback. Heck even a 50$ inkjet printer uses positional feedback. There is a paperfeed encoder and a linear encoder for head position. So why dont these plastic-squirters dont use that ?

The answer is simple. Because they are all run by underpowered crapduino based hardware that couldnt cope with the flurry of information that needs to be accounted for. It takes a brain with a substantial amount of processing power to deal with that.

Cheap ARM boards could be the solution… although Ive an inkjet printer with encoders and it uses a Renesas H8S which I dont think is particularly powerful. I think the issue has more to do with software (firmware).

Youd be amazed how much horsepower an h8 has..

But, it probably also has some motion control chip.

St has really nice stepper motor comtrollers. You can set acceleration , decelration , torque curves , and much more. Big whoppin tqfp with 80 pins.

And ot has i terface for a quadrature encoder so it will close the loop.

Aal the professional machinery, pick place, lathes , cnc, robots, waferhandlers , uses feedback from encoders. There is a reason for that.

Encoders dont really cost much.LoggedProfessional Electron Wrangler.