Sinterit Lisa SLS 3D printer now available at a lower price

Sinterit Lisa SLS 3D printer now available at a lower price

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Sinterit Lisa SLS 3D printer now available at a lower price

TheSinteritLisa was the first affordable desktop SLS 3D printer. Initially launched in 2015 after a lengthy period of R&D the Lisa is now available at a lower price.

The price of a ready to go Sinterit Lisa 3D printer starts at $6990 in the U.S. and €4990 in Europe. This makes the 3D printer the most affordable SLS 3D printer on the market.

The reduction in price is the result of extensive work focused on optimising the technological solutions, modifying the distribution system and launching online sales explains the company.

When I caught up with Sinterit co-founder Konrad Głowacki earlier this year at RAPID he took me through some of the improvements to the Sinterit 3D printing approach. One important element of this is the software and together with Autodesks Duann Scott Głowacki took me through how Autodesks Nettfabb software gives Sinterit users access to industrial grade optimization for the SLS process, at the part, build packing and parameter level to ensure professional results from the desktop SLS 3D Printer. This combination of affordable, professional software and hardware will open up the use cases for polymer additive manufacturing.

Industrial quality 3D prints for a range of applications

The Lisa has proved popular with a range of users. One group is universities who are looking to offer SLS 3D printing to their students. The Lisas low price when compared to other machines based on SLS technology means that it is more accessible to a much wider group. Students can become familiar with the not only the principles of design, but also gain practical hands on experience.

The Lisa is also in use at universities working on R&D around the development of SLS 3D printing.

Other applications include functional prototypes, which benefit from the improvement in surface finish due to possibility to build in a support free environment. Whereas FDM/FFF requires post processing to remove support material, which can leave marks, the Lisa 3D prints do not suffer this limitation.

As demonstrated in the photo below, the Lisa can 3D print movable and complex parts in a single piece. This makes freedom of form available to creators working with the 3D printer.

Sinterit says that, Today, the upgraded Lisa can be found in numerous design studios and offices ensuring a high quality of 3D print. The company are particular proud of the fact that Sinterit is making advanced technology accessible to small and medium organisations.

Sinterit are also changing their sales model, with the Lisa now available directly from the company. Thenew online shop can be accessed here.

Sinterit will be demonstrating the Lisa at next weeks TCT show in Birmingham. Visitor to hall 3, stand F31 to see more of the capabilities of the low cost desktop 3D printer. Sinterit will also be at Formnext from 14th to 17th November in Frankfurt.

Featured image shows the Sinterit Lisa in an engineers office.

Michael Petch is the editor-in-chief at 3DPI and the author of several books on 3D printing. He is a regular keynote speaker at technology conferences where he has delivered presentations such as 3D printing with graphene and ceramics and the use of technology to enhance food security. Michael is most interested in the science behind emerging technology and the accompanying economic and social implications.

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3D Printer Price List

Chart to see the price ranges of the various 3D printers.  3D Printers range from $6,000 to $750,000 and have different print quality, materials, build size and functionality.  Find a printer that fits your budget and requirements.   If you have any questions dont hesitate to call Computer Aided Technology.  CATI can answer your 3D printing questions and assist you with your Rapid Prototyping needs.

Stratasys family of 3-Dimensional Printing Systems brings high-resolution, fine-detailed models into the hands of designers or engineers and fits in any office environment. Stratasys patented PolyJet and FDM technology provides a complete 3D printing solution for virtually anyrapid prototypingapplication. Objet Studio Software guarantees that your models are printed smoothly and accurately.3d printing Pricesfor Stratasys line of 3d printers range from $6,000 $750,000 depending on the functionality, print materials and size of prints.

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Price Your Prints with a 3D Printing Price Calculator

Price Your Prints with a 3D Printing Price Calculator

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Price Your Prints with a 3D Printing Price Calculator

Kyle Stevens, of Macy Moo Studios, has developed a 3D Printing Price Calculator plug-in for WordPress that will make it easy for anyone to figure out approximately how much it would cost, in terms of material price, to print a solid 3D object. And you only need two variables: the amount of filament required to print your design and the amount you paid for a 1kg spool of the material.  Then, through the magic of mathematics behind Kyles simple user interface, youll see the estimated material cost to print your item.

To test it out, I loaded a 3D model of my wife, Danielle, into my Repetier-Host software and sliced it to make for a hollowed-out print.  The resulting G code output told me that Id need about 6257 mm of filament to print the object. Then, I entered the price for the 1 kg of LayBrick I just ordered[1]into the Filament Cost box and clicked calculate.  According to Kyles plug-in, it would cost me about $0.99 of filament to print my little lady!

Kyle warns, however, that his calculator is specifically tailored to solid prints made from 1.75 mm ABS filament. In order to better calculate a 10% or 20% infill, I should multiply the final cost by .1 or .2.  For materials like PLA and nylon, he says, the price should still be pretty close.  But what if Im using 3 mm LayBrick andnoinfill?  Well, this is only the first version of the calculator and Kyle hopes to improve it with user responses, saying:

Right now this plugin is only available on my website but thats only temporary as I hope to get a lot more feedback from others, work out any possible kinks in the design and add more features (like other materials). Once Im satisfied with the final product, itll become available on the WordPress plugin directory so anyone with a WordPress blog could download it for free and use it on their website.  I really want this to be available for anyone to use, so creating a user friendly design was keyI wouldnt rule anything out yet as to future versions and implementing it into open source software.

To use the calculator yourself or to watch Kyles tutorial, click here. And, in the case that you understand math better than I do, maybe you can take a look at the formula Kyle used to see if you can give him some tips on how to quickly evolve his user-friendly price calculator:

For 1mm of filament that is 1.75mm in diameter we need the volume of a cylinder.  Which is Pi * radius^2 * height.   The radius is 1.75/2 = 0.875mm

So, the volume of a 1mm length of the filament is 2.405.   Given the volume of the object divide by 2.405 gets you the number of millimeters of filament you need to form the object.

Not to lose you in the rest of this calculation but I then next figured out the density of ABS and the volume of an entire 2.2 pound spool.

The final calculation is (cost = cost of a spool * object volume/volume of a 2.2 lbs spool).

[1]I, actually, only ordered .25 kg, but I multiplied it by 4 for the sake of this calculation, which turned out to be about $152. High price to pay for fake concrete, I guess!

Michael Molitch-Hou previously served as Editor-in-Chief of 3D Printing Industry, he is now the Editor of Engineering . coms 3D printing section. He has covered additive manufacturing technology day in and day out since 2012 and has hundreds of article to his credit. He is the founder of The Reality Institute.

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