rs inDubai

ENERGY, PROCESS/UTILITIES, OILGAS

ARCHITECTURE,ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION

CULTURAL HERITAGE ARCHAEOLOGY

3D Printing Technologies 3D Printing Materials

3D LASER SCANNERS FOR REVERSE ENGINEERING (RE) / QUALITY CONTROL (QC)

On-demand low volume manufacturing of metal parts

D2M Solutions Becomes Middle East Reseller for Desktop Metal

IN THE MIDDLE EAST REGION IN OFFERING END-TO-END DESIGN TO MANUFACTURING SOLUTIONS

NEW STRATASYS F123 SERIES 3D PRINTERS

IN UAE, SAUDI ARABIA & WIDER MIDDLE EAST

D2M Solutions FZE, based in Dubai is Stratasys Gold Partner and supplies a full range of Stratasys 3D printers according to

PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) is a strategic business approach that applies a consistent set of business solutions in

3D Laser Scanners: Reverse Engineering or 3D digitization is the recovery of a physical objects geometrical structures with

D2M Solutions is Unique in the Middle East region in offering complete end-to-end design to manufacturing solutions for new product development.Read More

D2M Solutions can help you to optimize your Design to Manufacture process and bring better products to market faster – Watch our corporate video to get the latest on our revolutionary technologies and the solutions we offer.

New Stratasys 3D Printing Solution for Eyewear Aims to Get Frames to Market One Year Faster

D2M Solutions Becomes Middle East Reseller for Desktop Metal

D2M partner Creaform launches SmartDENT 3D, a powerful aircraft surface inspection software

Over the last two years, we have received amazing support from D2M Solutions technical support team. We have been continuously impressed by their professionalism and the speed at which they assist us every time we face issues. They always provide us with the best fit solutions. Due to the high-level of support, we can see the extra value that D2M brings to

Mr. Ahmad Ayesh, Design and Engineering SupportMidwest Oilfield Services, Oman

D2M has grown rapidly in recent years, providing unparalleled services in a challenging market. Without D2M, it would have been very difficult to introduce PLM technologies to Saudi Arabia. We share the same vision and we work together to make such technology accessible to all manufacturing sectors in Saudi Arabia

Director of Badir AMIRiyadh, Saudi Arabia

We are very happy with the great support we receive from D2M Solutions. Our relationship is beyond a normal sales relationship. It is a partnership which we expressed recently by inviting D2M to our event Shukran, (thank you)

Mr. Yasser Al-HamidiTexas A & M University,Qatar

SA 3D printer prices revealed

3D printing devices from MakerBot on show in South Africa. (Gareth van Zyl)

Johannesburg – Hobbyists and techies looking to buy 3D printers in South Africa will need to be prepared to part with over R14 000 for an entry-level hi-tech compact device from US company MakerBot.

3D printing entails computer controlled devices using electronic data or models to print successive layers of objects in any shape and geometric form. The technology was invented in 1984 but has started taking off this decade.

Objects created by 3D printers range from spanners, shoes and even flying drones.

Engineers and architects are also using 3D printing technology to build project models that can be tested in the real world.

And South Africa has taken to this craze as the likes of Cape Town last month witnessed the opening of the citys first3D printing studio.

Meanwhile,Rectronhas become the first official South African ICT and consumer electronics distributor for a popular US 3D printing brand dubbed MakerBot.

But thesehi-tech gadgetscome with hefty price tags, costing R14 018 (excluding VAT) for an entry-level compact MakerBot Replicator Mini 3D Printer, R20 380 (excluding VAT) for a MakerBot 2 Desktop 3D Printer and topping R66 256 (excluding VAT) for its biggest model, the MakerBot Replicator Z18.

And these prices exclude the 3D printing material or filament costs, which for the Mini 3D printer range from R212 for a khaki colour to R587 for glow in the dark. Filament for the Z18 has a minimum price of R1 349.

Examples of objects that can be created using 3D printing technology. (Gareth van Zyl)

However, Bruce Bradford, group business unit manager for the printer category at Rectron, told Fin24 that his business is targeting a mix of consumers and bigger education, engineering, architecture and design organisations. Rectron started selling MakerBot devices in SA on 1 November.

Weve sold a fair amount of units; weve met expectations on it, Bradford said, without disclosing exact sales numbers, but claiming the company has sold dozens to date.

So, whats nice is that weve sold a mix. So, weve sold the consumer the entry Mini and then weve also gone right through to the Z18 and the ones in between, which are obviously for more of the commercial use, he said.

Bradford said Rectron are also busy negotiating with a big retail chain. In the meantime, Rectron is selling 3D printers via its national reseller network, smaller retailers and e-commerce channels.

Owners of the MakerBot devices can also buy designs on an online store via the likes of an Apple iOS app with an Android app in the pipeline. Free 3D designs are also available on websites such asThingiverse.

MakerBot 3D printing products on display in /lepA9fHJRo

Worldwide shipments of 3D printers are forecast to reach 217 350 units in 2015, up from 108 151 in 2014, according to research from Gartner released in October.

Gartners research further forecast that 3D printer shipments will more than double every year between 2015 and 2018 to reach over 2.3 million.

Unit shipment growth rates for 3D printers, which languished in the low single and double digits per year throughout the 30 years since the first 3D printers were invented, are poised to increase dramatically beginning in 2015, said Pete Basiliere, research vice president at Gartner.

As radical as the forecast numbers may seem, bear in mind that even the 2.3 million shipments that we forecast will be sold in 2018 are a small fraction of the total potential market of consumers, businesses and government organisations worldwide, Basiliere added.

Comments have been closed for this article.

How to repair your iPhone X screen without forking out R15K

Coincheck to repay users who lost money in $400m hack

Icasa looking into MultiChoice deals with SABC and ANN7

WikiLeaks Assange asks UK court to lift arrest warrant

Telecoms to push into parallel markets

Shop 3D Printer Packages Autodesk – Ember

Ember consumables are now available from Colorado Photopolymer Solutions

Colorado Photopolymer Solutions (CPS), our trusted production partner, has taken over manufacture and distribution of Ember consumables. In addition to resins that were already available from Autodesk, CPS will be selling casting resin, as well as a few new resins of their own. For interested parties, CPS also offers custom resin formulation and characterization services.

Sign up for the Ember 3D printing newsletter

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTYvMDQvMDEvMDUvNDAvMDcvNTY5L2VtYmVyX2NhcnQucG5nIl1d/ember_cart.png?sha=fcea31f527b484a9

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTIvMDEvMDkvMTcvMDAvODYyL0F1dG9kZXNrX1Jlc2luc19DbGVhci5qcGciXV0/Autodesk_Resins_Clear.jpg?sha=8a7a256a7837cdbf

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTEvMTcvMDAvNDgvMDkvODk0L3RyYXlzLnBuZyJdXQ/trays.png?sha=bef28cc9f58d7016

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMDgvMDQvMDEvNDEvNDAvNjA3L3Byb2R1Y3RfdGh1bWJfYnVpbGRoZWFkLnBuZyJdXQ/product_thumb_buildhead.png?sha=bfb287a7b96a8be4

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTYvMDIvMTcvMTYvNDMvMzMvNjk0L1BlYWNvY2sgRmVhdGhlciBvbiBXaGl0ZS5qcGVnIl1d/Peacock%20Feather%20on%20White.jpeg?sha=aa68d43aa9f792fd

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTIvMDEvMDkvMTMvMDEvODE5L0F1dG9kZXNrX1Jlc2luX0JvdHRsZXMtQmxhY2suanBnIl1d/Autodesk_Resin_Bottles-Black.jpg?sha=53be59619a4c5775

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTEvMjgvMTIvNTgvNDkvNTY2L0F1dG9kZXNrX1Jlc2luX0JvdHRsZXMtQ3lhbi5qcGciXV0/Autodesk_Resin_Bottles-Cyan.jpg?sha=60c16c0b9e0ae030

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTEvMjgvMTMvMTYvMzYvODk5L0F1dG9kZXNrX1Jlc2luX0JvdHRsZXMtSUMuanBnIl1d/Autodesk_Resin_Bottles-IC.jpg?sha=59a9c0ace604b1c1

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTEvMjgvMTMvMDcvMzkvNDI3L0F1dG9kZXNrX1Jlc2luX0JvdHRsZXMtTWFnZW50YS5qcGciXV0/Autodesk_Resin_Bottles-Magenta.jpg?sha=1557fa9710d86404

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTEvMjgvMTMvMDgvMzQvNzYzL0F1dG9kZXNrX1Jlc2luX0JvdHRsZXMtV2hpdGUuanBnIl1d/Autodesk_Resin_Bottles-White.jpg?sha=d04f3fd6a5a68245

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTUvMTEvMjgvMTMvMDcvNTgvMTYxL0F1dG9kZXNrX1Jlc2luX0JvdHRsZXMtWWVsbG93LmpwZyJdXQ/Autodesk_Resin_Bottles-Yellow.jpg?sha=e2d7eec066f24632

/system/images/W1siZiIsIjIwMTYvMDMvMDcvMTcvMDYvMjEvNjg2L1N3aXBlci1Dcm9wcGVkLTAxLmpwZyJdXQ/Swiper-Cropped-01.jpg?sha=4a0b21230abc4d39

How to Calculate 3-D Printing Cost

Among the many recent developments in the ever-evolving, fast-moving world of technology is 3-D printingthe process of creating a three-dimensional, physical object from a digital file. Its an interesting departure from traditional, subtractive manufacturing methods that create objects by taking away mass from a raw material. In contrast, 3-D printing is additive: It builds objects bymaterial (commonly called filament) according to instructions in the file thats sent to the 3-D printer.

Most new technology carries a steep price tag as it hits the general consumer market, and 3-D printing is no different. The material and equipment costs of 3-D printing are still a bit steep as of late 2017 for most consumer (as opposed to commercial) uses at home or in small offices. In response, a host of 3-D printing service bureaus has sprung up to fill the void, performing the printing for those who would rather not invest in 3-D printers, materials, and training. The trouble is that costs are notorious for varying wildly among these providers; to complicate matters, costs change even within the same service as the technology matures. Given this steepness and variability in cost, getting a handle on them for comparison is important.

Several price-comparison services are available to help you estimate 3-D printing costs, which comes in especially handy if your slicer program does not do that for you already.

3YourMind: This free service lets you upload your file to compare the cost of printing it at different service bureaus. It returns production and delivery estimates in real time, so you always get the most current price from vendors. Especially convenient is the ability to add a plugin to Rhino, SolidWorks, Blender, Autodesk AutoCAD, Fusion360, and other 3-D design software. Accepted file formats include

.3dm, .3ds, .3mf, .acs, .amf, .catpart, .ctm, .dae, .fbx, .iges, .igs, .ipt, .jt, .obj, .ply, .prt, .skp, .slc, .sldprt, .step, .stl, .stp, .vda, .wrl,

3DCompare: Simply upload your file, and specify materials and measurements. The service then searches a regularly updated database to construct estimates that include actual printing costs, turnaround times, materials, and shipping fees from industry leaders such as Shapeways, Sculpteo, and iMaterialise. The database is updated regularly to ensure accurate, current information. Accepted file formats include

.stl, .obj, .3ds, .ac, .ac3d, .acc, .ase, .ask, .b3d, .blend, .bvh, b, .csm, .dae, .dxf, .enff, .hmp, .ifc, .irr, .irrmesh, .lwo,.lws, .lxo, .m3, .md2, .md3, .md5anim, .md5camera, .md5mesh, .mdc, .mdl, sh.xml, .mot, .ms3d, .ndo, .nff, .obj, .off, .pk3, .ply, .prj, .q3o, .q3s, .raw, .scn, .smd, .vta, .x, .xgl, .xml,

3DPrintHQ: Jason Kings thorough, informative post,The True Cost of Running a Desktop 3D Printer, explores various aspects of 3-D printing costs such as materials, electricity, initial printer investment, depreciation, and failed prints. Finally, he offers a cost comparison calculator tool and will send you a spreadsheet so you can run your own numbers.

All3DP: This site offers news, features, and reviews, as well as a3-D printing price comparisontool that provides quotes for printing at Shapeways, i.Materialise, and Sculpteo. More than that, it tells you prices for your model in the wide range of materials each service bureau offers, from simple ABS or PLA to sandstone, ceramic, and precious metals such as gold-plated stainless steel and stainless steel with medieval pewter.

3D Part Price: This 3-D pricing estimator is fast and simple. Just upload the file, change parameters as necessary, and choose a slicing engine. Calculations take less than a minute.

IC3D: This printer job cost calculator allows you to factor in some of your business costs. You need to know those costs, first, of course.

As 3-D printing technology, equipment, materials, and methods change, so do prices. Use these comparison tools to find your best solution.

Need to figure out copyright and 3D printing? Read on.

What materials are you 3D Printing with?

What Trends Are Making 3D Printing Better and More Available

How to Prep Your Model for 3D Printing

Removing 3D printed support can be a pain, here are some tips.

Sharp color prints and photos with Dells Color Smart Printer S5840cdn

What Is iCloud Drive and What Does it Cost?

Find Out How Much Blog Design Costs and What Youll Get for Your Money

Trying to find the best way to build a 3D model?

Is This Closed-Back Headphone Worth the Cost?

How Much Does a New HDTV Really Cost?

Here are the Mobile 3D Printing Apps You Need

Need to Print Something From the Internet?

Roadblocks and Implications for 3D Printing

Get the Most From Your Tech With Our Daily Tips

There was an error. Please try again.

The Cost Somparison between 3D Printing and 3D Printer

If you have any trouble logging in to your account,contact us.

To start 3D printing or Laser Cutting, youll need to create an account here. Once done, youll be able to upload your files and get live quotes of yours parts

Posted BySculpteoon Feb 20, 201420 comments

To compare the total costs involved with 3D printing at home versus ordering through our printing service, Sculpteo commissioned an independent study conducted by Strate College industrial design graduate Martin Toulemonde.

Weve created an infographic to illustrate the results of the study.

Various STL files were printed with Sculpteo and 6 different 3D printers priced under $50,000 USD. Three of these files are represented in the infographic. The STL files are linked below:• Space Invader ring by Geekrings• Robot mini-figurine by Emmanuel Eymond• GoPro grip mount by Fabrice

The materials and printing processes vary depending on which printer was used. Designs printed with Sculpteo were printed inwhite plasticusing an SLS process. Designs printed with the 6 different 3D printers were printed in the standard material and process for that printer. The specific materials and printing process technologies for each printer are outlined in the chart below.

Because the materials and printing processes vary, the quality of the final prints is variable as well. SLS and PolyJet printing typically results in the highest quality prints. But the focus of this study was to compare the price, not the quality.

The cost of printing with Sculpteos online service is based on the instant price given on (not including tax or shipping charges).

The costs of printing each item with a printer is broken down into 3 parts:1) Investment cost of the printer2) Materials & maintenance3) Labor & electricity

The investment cost of the printer for each item was determined by the retail price of the printer (not including tax or shipping charges) plus installation fees and then divided by the total number of units that could be printed over a 3 year timeframe.

The total number of units that could be printed was estimated by multiplying the number of units that fit in the printer at one time (printer capacity) by the number of times/trays the printer could print in a 3 year timeframe. 3 years was chosen as the average lifetime of a 3D printer.

For personal printers (Replicator, Fomr1) it was estimated that 30 jobs per year are performed, 90 jobs total. For professional printers (Mojo, uPrint, Z250, Objet30Pro), it was estimated that 100 jobs per year were made, 300 jobs in total.

Materials cost is determined by the retail price of the materials divided by how much material was needed for the print. Maintenance costs were based on the authors experience and included extra parts plus manual labor.

The estimated maintenance cost for each printer is outlined below:Replicator: 14% of the price of the machineForm1: 15% of the price of the machineuPrint: 2% of the price of the machineMojo: 4% of the price of the machineZ250: 50% of the price of the machineObjet 30 Pro: 25% of the price of the machine

For hobbyist printers (ReplicatorX and Form1) no costs were added for manual labor. For professional printers (Mojo, uPrint, Z250, Objet30Pro), a cost of $27 per hour was added. (Time calculated is for manual involvement in printing, not the active printing time of the object.) Nearly all of the cost illustrated by the orange portion of the bars is for labor.

For electricity, a cost of $0.18 kilowatts per hour was added. And for the Objet30 Pro, an additional cost for water of $0.005 per liter was added. These costs were negligible.

The cost of printing with Sculpteo is generally the least expensive option for 3D printing designs with a volume of less than 25cm3. The cost is close but still less expensive than using a consumer, hobbyist printer. (But the hobbyist printers do not account for the manual time spent.)

The cost comparison in Euros and USD, plus three additional larger objects that were printed for the study, is shown in the chart below.

3D printers, materials and technologies

Turning a Picture into a 3D Model: Convert Photos to 3D

Best free CAD software: Top of 24 simple CAD program

How to Choose your Next Professional 3D Printer

How to start a successful 3D printing business today

DIY Tutorial: How to get a finished product look for your 3D printed parts

Should you buy a 3d printer or use a 3d printing service

How to Choose Between 3D Printing Services

Subscribe and receive news about Sculpteo and 3D printing every week

*We do not disclose your email address to third parties and we will not send you unsolicited email.

94800 Villejuif, France+33 1 83 64 11 22

San Francisco, CA 941031-(US toll free)

How Much Does A 3D Printer Cost?

I wish that were an easy answer. There is a wide variety in the types of 3D printers and their size, features, quality, durability and performance all factor into a 3D printers price. Heres a quick guide to how much does a 3d printer cost; what prices you should expect to pay and what kind of features will accompany each:

Printers in this category are primarily toys but are a great way to experiment and learn about 3D printing. They will only be able to print objects around 3-4 in each dimension (width, length, height) and likely limited to printing in one material. These printers are slow, noisy, have poor print quality and not very durable. However, for printing small objects and getting a feel for how a 3D printer works, they do the job.

Printers in this category are often surprisingly capable, but often have 1-2 fatal flaws that undermine their value. These prints can often print a bit larger than entry-level printers, perhaps 5-6 in each dimension. They are a bit faster and might be able to print a few different materials. Youll often find that their speeds and print quality are lacking. Most of the printers in this class, are not made to run for significant lengths of time and youll have to do a lot of repairs / maintenance to keep them running. These printers are good for someone who likes 3D printing as a hobby, perhaps for use by grade schools. However, these printers are not at all suitable for commercial use or in educational settings where you need them to print at specified times reliably.

The enthusiast category is exploding and delivering solid printers that are great for certain applications. Printers in this category can deliver good sized prints; often as large as 8 to 12 in each dimension. Printers in this category have reasonable speed and decent print quality (note: for most printers, slower speeds are required to generate good print quality; conversely the faster they print, you will sacrifice print quality). In this category, youll have greater selection in materials that can print, although some enthusiast printers require you to use the manufacturers standard materials which limit your options. Unfortunately, many printers in this price range are still not very durable and will require significant maintenance and repairs if you plan to operate them for significant amounts of time (160+ hours per month). These printers are appropriate for use in grade schools and infrequent use in high schools. Some businesses might find them suitable, but will often be frustrated by repairs if used frequently.

The performance category holds the promise of the greatest amount of value in 3D printing today and are poised to significantly disrupt the sales of printers in the industrial segment. These printers have large build areas (12 in each dimension) and often can print pretty good quality parts. Most printers in this category can print a wide range of materials, although to print them well, the manufacturer should provide print profiles optimized to each material for their slicer software. When shopping for a performance printer, there are 2 key features to look for. First, the best performance printers have the ability to print parts both quickly while maintaining superior print resolution. Dont only rely on published specifications; you need to look at a physical sample print and evaluate the settings the print was done at along with the actual time to print. Second, when making the sizable investment required by this price class, you want to evaluate the durability of the printer and required maintenance as this will still vary greatly. Printers in this class are perfectly suitable in Education (middle schools, high schools, universities and robotics clubs) as well as in a wide range of commercial environments (small business to large enterprises).

The printers in the Industrial class differ from the Performance class in a few ways. These printers can print in high quality at good speeds, however you pay a significant premium for this privilege. These printers are truly *industrial* with very slick interfaces and durable construction and metal fabricated exteriors. Industrial manufacturers charge a high price for the base printer, but also charge annual maintenance contracts as well as require you to purchase proprietary materials at a premium to those available on the open market. Also, the selection of materials in this space are surprisingly limited and expensive. While these printers are durable and reliable, their price makes them only appropriate for large enterprises who can afford their large price tag. This price tag makes this class of printers prohibitively expensive for most universities. The irony of these machines is that due to the high operating costs, one can argue there is a disincentive for encouraging their use by employees & students. Because of this, the Performance class of 3D printers becomes an attractive alternative to industrial printers for a wide variety of businesses.

Interested in learning more about the best performance 3D printer on the market today?

to get customized information about the Fusion3 F400 Affordable, High-Performance 3D Printer.

Eleven New 3D Printing Filaments Recently Certified For Fusion3 3D Printers

Eight Additional Filaments Certified For Fusion3s 3D Printers

Fusion3 F400 High-Resolution 3D Printer

Optimized Carbon Fiber 3D Printer: Fusion3 F400

Alternative To Expensive Industrial 3D Printers: Fusion3 F400

Each week we host live, interactive webinars to demonstrate the operation and capabilities of our F400-S 3D Printers.

Build a Laser 3D Printer – Stereolithography at Home

Build a Laser 3D Printer – Stereolithography at Home

Introduction: Build a Laser 3D Printer – Stereolithography at Home

Here is how to make a Stereolithography 3D Printer. It is still a bit of a work in progress but so far it is working pretty well. This is mainly an experiment which started as aDelta Robot Stereolithography Printerbut ended as a more traditional Cartesian Stereolithography Printer.

Ill be honest, were throwing science at the walls here to see what sticks. No idea what itll do. – Cave Johnson

Stereolithography(SL or SLA from Stereolithography Apparatus) is an additive manufacturing process using a vat of liquid UV-curable photopolymer resin and a UV laser to build parts one layer at a time. On each layer, the laser beam traces a cross-section pattern of the part onto the surface of the liquid resin. Exposure to the UV laser light cures, solidifies the pattern traced on the resin and adheres it to the layer below.

I have wanted a 3D Printer for a while now and there are some very reasonably priced kits available like theMakerbotUltimakerand theRepRapproject. I could have just bought a kit and started printing things but at the time I had not seen great resolution or print quality from those. I started looking around at the other 3D printing technologies and found SLA made some amazing quality prints, so I decided to try making my own. Since I started this a while back those projects have come a long way and they can make somebeautiful printsnow. There are also people working on a UV resin andDLP projector 3D printerwhich is showing promise.

I decided to enter this in the Epilog Challenge Contest because I could really use a laser cutter 🙂 I also have some ideas how to redesign this project, for creation on a laser cutter. I wouldnt mind making kits for people if I had one.

Something to keep in mind is the current cost of commercially available UV/Visible resins. 1 Liter is about $200 – $250 so compared to ABS or PLA for the plastic extrusion printers it is about 4 – 5 times more as far as I can tell. There are other types of resin that are cheaper but I do not know how well they will work.

Since I wasnt really sure if this was going to be a viable method of creating 3D objects, this was a fairly cheap and quickly designed project. I have a small Taig CNC Mill for cutting metal so the custom parts are made of scrap aluminum I had laying around. You can probably use wood and maybe even hand cut the parts if you are careful.

This project isOpen Source Hardware.

This is a list of the parts I used.General Parts3 – 16 x 171/2 x 3/4 Plywood for the back and sides of the case2 – 16 x 16 x 3/4 Plywood for the top and bottom of the case24 – 6 x 3 wood screws and washers4 – Rubber Stoppers 1 7/8 x 1 3/44 – 1/4-20 x 2 1/2 Bolts8 – 1/4-20 Nuts and washers1 – 4 x 4 x 1/4 Black Acetal sheet (Delrin)1 – 1 Liter BeakerLinear Rail and BlocksfromAutomation Overstock4 – AG Linear Rail 15mm x 200mm2 – 15mm Bearing Block, 2 Bolt Flange2 – 15mm Bearing Block, 4 Bolt FlangeElectronics PartsfromSparkfunand others6 – microswitches with roller3 – ROB-09238 Stepper Motors3 – EasyDriver Stepper Drivers (Pololu drivers should work too)3 – Polarized Connectors 4-Pin housing3 – Polarized Connectors 4-Pin Header2 – 6 pin female headers2 – DC Barrel Jack Adapters – Female1 – Sanguino (Arduino Mega would work too with code modifications)1 – 5V FTDI USB Cable1 – Omron G5V-1 Relay1 – LD33V 3.3V Voltage Regulator2 – 9V 500ma or higher Power Supplies (could use one but they are cheap)1 – 12V – 24V 2000ma or higher Power Supply (for Stepper Motors)1 – TIP120 Transistor1 – 1K Resistor1 – Protection Diode such as 1N41482 – 2 pin screw terminalsVarious Male and female .1 headers, wire and protoboard big enough to fit everythingLeadscrewfromMcMaster-Carr1 – 1018 Carbon Steel Precision Acme Threaded Rod, 1/4-16 Size, 3 LengthLeadnutsfromDumpsterCNC3 – Acme 1/4-16 (1 Start) Leadnuts Square flange 4 hole3 – Acme 1/4-16 (1 Start) Couplers 5mm BoreLaser partsfromAixiz1 – Aixiz blue laser glass lens1 – Aixiz 405nm violet laser 20mW1 – Iris Diaphragm, Zero Aperture, 21mm Outer Diameter fromEdmund OpticsThe UV/Visible light cure resinfromEllsworth Adhesives1 – liter Dymax 3099 Ultra Light-Weld Adhesiveor1 – liter Loctite 3105 Light Cure AdhesiveTools NeededDrill and various bitsDrill PressJigSaw4-40 tapAccess to a CNC MillGorilla glue or similarLong clampsHacksawFilesSafetyLaser Safety Goggles such asthese. They must protect against 405nm light to be effective.Well ventilated area, dont inhale the vapors from the resin or those produced when curing.

A couple of notes before you begin.

The bearing blocks come with a piece of plastic where the rail goes, this holds the bearings in place. Do not take it out. When putting the bearing block on the rail just push the plastic piece out with the rail. If you have to take the block off the rail push the rail out with the piece of plastic lining it up the way it came.

Some of the pictures have bearings for support on the end of the Acme rods, I found that they were not needed due to the short length of the rod.

If the assembly order doesnt work right or you have questions about anything let me know and I will modify the instructable to include the changes.

Please use laser safety goggles for 405nm lasers. This laser is strong enough to cause permanent eye damage.

Cut all the parts on the mill. The part drawings are attached as dxf files and the sketchup file is there also.

Drill holes in the stepper mount flanges and the edge of the Acme nut block. See image notes above.

Insert the Acme nut into the mounting block and mark the holes. Drill them out and tap them with a 4-40 tap or drill them larger and use machine screws long enough to go through and a nut to hold them.

See the drawing above for how to cut out the top part of the case.

XY – Main Beam Acme Rod Mount 12.7mm.dxf

Mark, drill and tap with a 6-32 tap the bottom of the stepper mount. Attach the stepper mount to the bottom plate with 6-32 machine screws.Attach the stepper to the stepper mount. My stepper used M3 screws.Mount the linear rail to the bottom plate using 4-40 screws and nuts.Drill holes in the laser mount flanges and mount to a 2 hole bearing block. (I know it shows a 4 hole block in the pictures you should use a 2 hole block.)

First put the rails into the two bearing blocks making sure to push the plastic bearing retainer out with the rails. Then screw the plate to the two bearing blocks. Check to make sure the rails are parallel by measuring the distance apart at both ends of the rails. Then check that they are square to the plate. If they are not parallel then loosen the screws and adjust until they are and then tighten.Once the assembly is adjusted set it on the top piece of the case and then mount the stepper. Screw the Acme rod into the nut and the coupler then attach to the stepper.Once everything is lined up mark and drill the holes for the rails to attach to the top piece of the case. Attach with machine screws, nuts and washers on the outside of the board.

Drill the flange holes in the Z arm mount. Drill and tap 4-40 holes in the end of the arm mount by the slot. See the picture below.The arm should fit into the slot and stick out a little past the end. Cut a short piece of 1/8 thick 2 x 1 aluminum and drill holes to match the ones in the end of the arm mount. Then place the arm into the slot and screw the aluminum on to clamp the arm in place. See the pictures above if you need clarification.In the bottom piece of the case use a jigsaw to cut out the hole for the Z axis stepper.To mount the stepper to the case bottom you can see the picture above but that was actually kind of hard to line up right. You could find a single piece of aluminum that is wide enough to cut a hole that matches the raised circle area on the stepper. Once it is cut you can mark and drill the holes for the stepper and then holes to mount to the case.To mount the circle platform onto the arm just drill and tap with 4-40 tap the bottom of the arm then drill a hole in the platform and mount with a screw.

Clamp the box together as shown and make sure everything is as square as you can make it. Then drill holes following the pictures above and screw together with wood screws and washers.You can use store bought leveling feet or just make some with a stopper, bolt, 2 washers and 2 nuts. Follow the pictures above. Just drill into the stopper far enough to fit the head of the bolt then drill holes in the bottom of the case. Use a bullseye bubble level to level the case by placing it in the center of the bottom then turn the bottom nut on each foot to get the case level.Cut three 9 (about 228mm) lengths of ACME rod. File the ends so that the threads are formed well enough to thread into the ACME nuts. You may have to use a small triangle file to form the threads back to a usable shape.Once the case is assembled you can attach the Z axis linear rail to the back of the case. First assemble the whole Z Axis including the linear rail, the ACME rod and the ACME coupler. slide the coupler onto the stepper shaft. The rail should be flush with the back of the case, if not then you may need to adjust the position of the Z stepper.Position the rail about where it is in the pictures above and mark the 4 sides. Take the Z assembly back out. Measure the rail from the end to the center of the first hole then the space between the other holes and mark lines across the outline of the rail on the back of the case. Find the center of your marks on the back of the case and draw a line down. Where the lines cross drill holes to mount the Z axis rail and then mount it.Drill a hole in the top big enough for the 4 pin connectors on the steppers to go though.

I may design a proper circuit board for all this but since I was designing as I went this was the most flexible setup for me.Hopefully the drawings and pictures make sense, let me know if clarification is needed. This was my first use ofFritzingso its not as pretty as I could probably make. The Fritzing file is attached below.Start by soldering the polarized 4 pin connectors into the Easydriver boards on top. Then solder the male header pins into the other holes on the Easydrivers on the bottom*.*One thing I should have done is put the header pins marked MS1 and MS2 on the top so it was easy to jumper them to ground or solder up some headers on the protoboard for jumpers. I ended up wanting to change the microstepping from the default of 8th step microstepping. I have added these jumpers to the drawings now.Once you have the male headers soldered, cut the female ones to match then put them on the male pins and place them in the protoboard spaced out with enough room to work.Solder the screw terminal to one end then wire up it up to each of the headers for the Pwr In on the Easydrivers. Mark + and – on the  screw terminal.I used a 10 pin header and ribbon cable to pass the 6 step and direction pins and ground to the Sanguino. you could just put a regular header row to pass the signals straight to the Sanguino. Dont forget to connect the ground from the different boards together.The wire colors for the coil pairs in my steppers are yellow+blue and green+red. Verify your stepper coil pairs by followingthese instructions. Solder the female polarized headers to the stepper wires using the pairs you verified for your steppers.The drawings show headers for the microstepping selection. I am using half steps for the X and Y axis and it is working pretty well. To use half stepping put a jumper on the ms2 pin to ground.

There is most likely a better way to do this but I am not an Electrical Engineer, the parts I used were on hand. This setup has worked fine for me for hours of printing so far.The drawings below are a little different than what I have wired but should work. You could also put this all on one board, this was the biggest board I had on hand.The Laser driver board takes 9V from a wall wart power supply to drive the relay and the LD33V 3.3V Voltage Regulator that powers the laser. The TIP120 transistor switches the relay which switches the ground of the laser to turn it on or off.

The limit switches keep the controller from accidentally moving too far in one direction. They can also be used to home the machine and tell it where to start from.Solder wire to the NC and common pins on each switch.Put a little dab of gorilla glue on the switch then place it so the bearing block with hit the switch before going too far. A 1/2 in from the end of the rail is fine. Tape them in place, making sure they make good contact to the wood. The X axis ones were glued to the aluminum plate and it worked fine. If you have switches with holes for mounting you can drill and mount them that way. I couldnt find screws small enough for the mounting holes on the ones I had.Run the wires up and out the hole for wires in the top of the case. I tacked them in place with wire staples.Solder all of the common side switch wires into a 6 pin female header. Then solder the NC side wires to another 6 pin female header.

Mount the boards to the top of the case with screws or nonconductive double sided foam tape.*Do not plug any power in before you connect the steppers. Connecting or disconnecting the steppers while power in on to the stepper drivers will fry the driver board.Connect the the steppers to the Easydrivers.Connect the laser to the 3.3V header for it on the laser board.Connect the ground for the limit switches and then the signal to digital pins on the Sanguino. I used 17-22.Connect the Step and Dir pins to the Sanguino. I used 2-7.Connect the laser pin to the Sanguino. I used pin 23.Make sure ground from the laser board and the stepper board are both connected to ground on the Sanguino.Connect all the power supplies. 9V for the laser board, 9V for the Sanguino and 12V – 24V for the Stepper board. I connect all of these to a power strip to control them all at once. You could wire a header on the laser board and then connect it to the Vin pin on the Sanguino to power it from there if you want.Connect the the 5V USB FTDI cable to the Sanguino. It is marked with the wire colors. If using an Arduino Mega just use a regular USB cable.

Download and install theArduino IDEand install it. If using a Sanguino seethis pagefor the rest of the setup.Download and installReplicatorgand install it.Download the file UVLPrinter.zip below and extract it to your Arduino Sketchbook folder or just open UVLPrinter.pde wherever you extract it from. It contains a modified version of theSprinter firmware.Open the pins.h tab and change any pins that you may have connected differently than my setup.The step and dir pins should be easy to find, the MIN_PIN and MAX_PIN for each axis are the top and bottom limit switches. Anything with a -1 is not used. Everything else should be easy to figure out.define X_STEP_PIN         6define X_DIR_PIN          7define X_MIN_PIN          19define X_MAX_PIN          20If you are using anything other than half stepping you will need to go into the configuration.h tab and change the following line.float axis_steps_per_unit[] = 251.971678, 252.4475, 1007.87402,700; //Half StepThe information needed to figure this out is the 16 Turns per inch on the Acme rod, the 200 steps per turn of the stepper and the microstepping. If using 1/8th stepping then take the 200 steps of the stepper times 8 to get 1600 steps.The calculation for figuring out the steps per mm for 8th stepping is:1 inch is 25.4mm so 25.4 / 16 TPI = 1.5875 mm per turn1.5875 mm / 1600 steps = .0009921875 mm per step1 mm / .0009921875 mm per step = 1007.87402 steps per mmSo for 8th stepping you would put 1007.87402 for each axis like this:float axis_steps_per_unit[] = 1007.87402, 1007.87402, 1007.87402,700; // 1/8th StepThe following lines are for configuring the max speed the steppers will try to move at. I start to loose steps past 400 and the Z axis doesnt need to go faster than 200. Test out your setup and change if needed.float max_feedrate[] = 400, 400, 200, 500000;float homing_feedrate[] = 400,400,200;Once you have made any changes needed you can verify and upload the code to the Sanguino.To setup Replicatorg copy the file uvlprinter.xml into the machines folder in the replicatorg folder.Start Replicatorg and click on the Machine menu then Driver and choose UV Laser Printer. Set the serial port to the one you are using. On the GCode menu and Choose GCode Generator choose Skeinforge (40).Go to File then Examples and pick any of them. then press the Generate Gcode button. Press the duplicate button and Name it UV3D or whatever you want. Select that profile and click the Locate button. It will open a folder with the settings for this profile. Click cancel on the GCode Generator window. Copy everything from the UV3D .1mm.zip file into this folder replacing what is there.You should be configured with the basic settings for running the printer.

Place the laser in the slot for it and tack in place with dabs of hot glue on each side.Put on Laser Safety goggles now.To turn on and off the laser, open Replicatorg and connect to the printer. Click the control panel and then toggle the checkbox for Valve.Move the Z axis down to about the level where you will fill the beaker. I usually fill it to about 500ml unless I am printing something tall.  Turn the lens in the laser until the dot is a small as it can go, there is a point where it will get small then big again, try to get it as small as possible.Slide the iris into the slot for it and line it up with the laser. Center the iris by turning the laser on and moving the iris around. Close the iris slowly and watch the dot get dimmer until it almost disappears then open it up just a little bit so the dot is small and not too bright.Once you have it lined up carefully tack it in place with hot glue. There is probably a better way to do this with set screws or something else but I havent spent the time to redesign it yet.You will have to adjust the iris and laser focus if you change the build height. I have not come up with an easy calibration system yet. I will update this if I do. Right now I adjust the iris and print something and see how well the layer thickness and line width worked.

Using the 1 Liter beaker that I have the print area is about an 85mm circle by about 100mm tall. You can adjust the build area size in the uvlprinter.xml file if needed.To use Replicatorg there is already an excellent How To atMakerbots wiki.To set the Z height on this machine pour the resin into the beaker up to the height that you set the laser at. Use the control panel in replicatorg to move the Z platform down into the resin to coat the platform then back up to just above the surface of the resin. Set all the axises to 0 then close the control panel and print.The Z axis lowers into the resin then raises and waits a few seconds after each layer is printed. The commercial printers use a wiper to wipe a precise amount of resin across the part but that would have made the design much more complicated. This process isnt perfect but so far seems to work alright.I have only done a little bit of work with coloring the resin so far. What I have tested so far is using Castin Craft pigments and dyes and they seem to work.

So, there it is. It works, but should you build one? Well that depends on what you want to get out of building/buying a 3D printer. If you just want to print 3D things for cheap then no, I wouldnt build one. Get a Makerbot or an Ultimaker or build a RepRap. If you want to tinker and possibly get some amazing prints and dont mind that they cost a bit more to print than the others then go for it. I would love to have some other people testing and thinking up new ways to tweak this.As for cost of building the machine, I think I spent about $600 – $800 for everything. Less than the extruder printers but the material cost is about 4-5 times more so its not really the economy option.There are also other ways to print with UV cured resins, like using a DLP projector to show images for long enough to cure a layer. There is one person that has made one that seems to work well but it looks like it is closed source and going to be expensive when he starts selling it. There is also a Yahoo group calleddiy_3d_printing_and_fabricationwith people sharing their DLP based builds and resin tests.You should have used a laser galvanometer (galvo)! Sounds great, if you find one accurate enough for under a few hundred dollars let me know!Just for fun, the picture above shows most of the bad prints Ive made so far.I probably missed something so let me know if you have questions and I will get to them as soon as I can. Thanks for reading.

I try to build with Arduino Mega, Can you tell me what need to be modified in filmware. thankyou

You said that galvos are expensives and you are right. I just would like to know if you have some idea about how much faster they cold be.

I dont read the complete tutorial but I saw the video and I can imagine that your printer is as fast as a Prusa or any other ABS extruder printer. Do Iam right?

Actually galvos are not THAT expensive. An XY table using steppers and linear slides also cost money and galvos are not THAT much more expensive. I have a set which cost around $100 and wrote my own hardware driver ($5 in parts) and software for it. It is however a lot faster and more accurate

Cut three 9 (about 228mm) lengths of ACME rod. File the ends so that

the threads are formed well enough to thread into the ACME nuts. You may

have to use a small triangle file to form the threads back to a usable

We had a retired Tool and Die maker for our High School Metals shop teacher – funny guy, and some of the lessons have stuck for more than four decades.

While using a small flat file to dress the cut end of the threaded rod is always a good idea, dressing the threads is simpler: simply run a nut down the rod until it is clear below the level of the cut. As you turn the nut off the new end, it should roll any slightly damaged threads back into alignment.

(If you are really worried, use an appropriate sized die instead.)

Whether it may be something like this? This project printer that collect money it will cost only $ 100. Pretty impressive

how much does this project cost in total?

Hey I have the printr bot simple would that work with a few mods and if so what mods would I need???

This would be hard, but definitely possible. Good luck!

Someone was ispired by your project:

Can not laser engraving to become this type of printer? I watched that engraving is for 80-90 dollars.

I am working on a 3D printer using the Galvo principal

I picked up a laser light show box from

They had them on special for AUD$80.00

The good thing is the mirrors are mounted on steppers and the blue laser has a focus adjustment.

I plan on the driving the steppers with an

And solid state relay (to drive the laser)

I found a linear guide and ball screw at work (Lucky me)

And I needed a stepper for the Z axis

I have most of the main parts now, all I need is time to assemble and test

What prevents the beam from traveling under the surface to cure unintended dross? Is there a focal point? Does the resin have some absorption factor that prevents scatter?

hi im very new to this and was wondering if someone could tell me how to program the basic movements of a 3d printer and how you program the stepper motors and everything is it just g code ?

hi im very new to this and was wondering if someone could tell me how to program the basic movements of a 3d printer and how you program the stepper motors and everything is it just g code ?

Game changer in lowering the barrier to entry. What youre seeing

in the video isnt much more than a proof of concept, theres obviously

As for strength of parts, I dont see any reason to think theyd be

weaker than low-end FDM printed parts which are notorious for splitting

must to download pdf file to make a 3d printer sla?

hi can i use this printer for making jewelry models?

I had the same thought exactly about other extruder based 3D printers. So nice to see you have done so much good work with this =)

And I dont know too much about this, but do you know of any way to improve accuracy?

Ok great I got my firmware to work. Ij ust started over. I have one question. I have my Skeinforge profile set up and the machine set up in ReplicatorG. When I hit run I am getting errors saying that the g_Code is telling each axis to run faste rthan it is allowed to run…where would I tweak that? Thanks

you have to double check if the acceleration is enabled. This error message is for makerbots I believe…as long as your motors are enabled to accelerate and able to pull the tourque you should be ok.

Hey, great project! I got one up and running based on your software. I still have one issue with the M113 code. This in reprap is for the power management…I was wondering if you used this command to reduce the power on your laser or of you eliminated it from the code with the replace files. If you did eliminate it, how is that accomplished? Did you use a replace and truncate command?

Nice work. I am interesting in laser module. Please tell me what is laser module name?

Hi RobHopeless, I have read with attention your projects and it is very interesting. I should know if with the laser system the final resolution of the object is the same of a DLP system I ask it because I am interested to built a 3D printer top/down but I dont know betwen the two system is the better. Regards Claudio.

Mostly what I have done so far is adjust the laser and iris then print a sample and measure it and either adjust the laser or the settings to fit.

Thanks, Ill have to look into that too.

great piece of work, is the Iris a must or will it work without.

I am planning to create a 3doodler type handheld device that uses resin instead of filament, and I was wondering if this type of resin can cure fast enough to support itself if it has a laser focused on the stream coming out of the nozzle?

any way to let the laser pulse and shoot dots like a co2 laser engraver does? now it follows the lines made by the software which I think is not as good for very fine work. let the laser pulse and overlap the dots resulting in even finer work.

thank you for your amazing 3d printer

but i cant upload UVL Printer code to my arduino mega

when i click verify Button strand with : HIGH was not declared in this scope errore

Great Instructable! You could use FDM to print the complex parts in PLA (although youd errr … have to have an FDM printer to do that)

Just for info, there is now a nice DLP projector instructable by TristramBudel:

Im seriously thinking that merging the two ideas might prove interesting!

Great Instructable! Just for info, there is now a nice DLP projector instructable by TristramBudel:

Im seriously thinking that merging the two ideas might prove interesting!

you did an amazing job. making stuff in and of itself is easy and fun. the resolution is amazing compared to filament 3d printers. how does the accuracy from file dimensions to finished product compare? i would like to use a 3d printer of the resin variety for quality resolution, but i also want it to make parts with reasonable tolerances as well.

WOW. Great Work. I like your project

Hello, very much like your project. Give me a Arduino mega using firmware do? E-mail: Thank you very much for your help!

To my understanding the laser ground switched by the relay needs to be switched to the 9V ground. That is – when ever the TIP 120 transistor gives a signal, the relay coil is activated and the laser ground needs to be connected to the 9V ground.

Now, in the circuit picture, the 9V ground is connected to the lower right leg of the relay (when looking from above), which according to the relay spec is indeed the leg that is switched when the coil is activated. In the Fritzing diagram, however, the 9V ground is connected to the lower left leg of the relay. Is that a mistake?

Great work. I was contemplating attempting this or maybe just buying a formslab. Stereo-lithography seems to produce better quality part than the abs filament type 3d printer.

wow there is a great projects for beginners!

There are some really good things for people to learn here. (from your instructions, especially)

Hi. Sorry if you have already covered this, I havent been able to read every word of your instructable….yet, but, what is the curing time for the adhesive you use? I know of some fiberglass resins that uv cure, really inexpensive, figured I could try them out as a viable option. Im pretty sure Im going to be making this soon. Thank you and awesome instructable btw!

Well I have firmware and my machine speed set correctly…I think. However, Replicator G is locking up when I do something siimple like open the manual axis controls and try to jog and axis. Also If I send a job to the machine Replicator G sits there and tells me that it is estimating a build time. Does this take a long time normally? Thanks

I just converted my old Darwin RepRap over to run just like your machine. Im having problems getting the Firmware to compile for an Arduino Mega. It is getting hung up. Any suggestions? My coding skills are extremely lacking. I changed the mother board to the Mega in the cod.

The 3D Printing Price War Begins

Until now, the realm of 3D printing has been targeted more toward industry and commercial markets. After all, the machines cost thousands of dollars (or more) for large-scale 3D printing production. Now we have the launch of two smaller format 3D printing devices in just the past two days. With prices close to $1,000 for the units, it quite simply means that the target market for 3D printing is YOU!

Following announcements from the Consumer Electronics Show and other previews of smaller 3D printing devices this year, we now have more and more options for 3D printing devices for the home, office, classroom or even a dorm.

If you have a need for this sort of machine, the low price points mean that the consumer and small businesses will win. Unfortunately, this will mean ever more intense competition among the 3D printing leaders. It is hard to call anything a price war right at the start of a launch, but this is a development that could easily escalate into a full-blown price war ahead.

3D Systems Corp. (NYSE: DDD) has confirmed that its recently unveiled Cube 3 and CubePro 3D printers will start its commercial shipments in the second half of June 2014. These are now available for preorder. The Cube 3 and CubePro take the consumer 3D printing and desktop engineering experience with multi-color and multi-materials, and what it says is the highest resolution available at 70 micron layers, faster print speeds and printing on the go, directly from a smartphone with the new Cubify mobile app, to be released when the printers ship.

3Ds Cube 3 and CubePro home and desktop 3D printers are priced as follows: Cube 3 starts at $999 and the CubePro starts at $2,799.

ALSO READ: Why One Analyst Still Sees 3D Systems Rising to $100

Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS) just announced on Monday that its MakerBot subsidiary has launched its MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printer to target homes, schools, offices and dorm rooms. The Mini allows users to find more than 300,0000 free downloadable digital 3D printable items and is priced at $1,375. And its also expects to ship its other new 3D printer, the MakerBot Replicator Z18 3D Printer, in June.

So, what is there to think here? Having an entry-level price at $1,000 may not sound expensive at all, but of course it does not include materials and any purchases along the way. If prices start at $999 from 3D Systems and $1,375 from Stratasys, imagine where they will be in a few years if 3D printing becomes more mainstream.

Perhaps the biggest question is whether Hewlett-Packard Co. (NYSE: HPQ) will get in the game in time, or whether it will just become part of the implied price wars here. Meg Whitman was very excited to get into 3D printing, but the company then retracted the time frame and has since gone far less vocal about what it sees as the opportunity here. If one company knows how to sell printing to small businesses and consumers, Hewlett-Packard would fit that bill.

As a reminder, price wars even if they are not declared price wars such as this instance are great for consumers and businesses who need to be the equipment and services. They are generally not good for the companies in a price war.

Stratasys shares were recently trading at $88.75, with a 52-week range of $74.54 to $138.10 and a consensus price target of $127.33. 3D Systems was recently trading at $50.22, with a 52-week range of $41.05 to $97.28 and a consensus price target of $70.63.

ALSO READ: Analyst Sees Three Companies as Possible Buyers of Rackspace

Lockheed Martin Wins a Quarter-Billion Dollars Worth of Defense Contracts

Pentagon Awards $583.4 Million in Defense Contracts

Technology3D printingfeatured3D Systems (NYSE:DDD)Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE:HPQ)Stratasys (NASDAQ:SSYS)

Americas Happiest (and Most Miserable) States

Largest Native American Population in Every State

The Most Evangelical States in America

How Bad Is the Flu Season in Every State?

States With the Highest and Lowest Gas Taxes

Mondays Biggest Winners and Losers in the S&P 500

3 Things to Watch When This Top-Performing 3D Printing Company Reports Q4 Earnings

Tech Is Walking Away From Wearables

Nintendo Switch Is the Fastest-Selling Console in U.S. History

Sky rises 2.5%, U.K. regulator says Fox takeover not in the public interest

EasyJet shares rise 5.2% after Q1 update

EasyJet shares rise 5.2% after Q1 update

3 Buy Ranked Stocks That Surged Today

5 Top Blue-Chip Earnings Charts to Watch

Netflix (NFLX) Soars On Historic Subscriber Growth

Report: Ex-Formula 1 star Lauda buys back airline he founded

Blackstones Wien sees a market correction on the way

The Latest: Mexico slams US decision on solar panels tariff

Squirming On The Floor And A $200,000 Payout: Travis Kalanicks Last Months At Uber

Amazon Narrows Down Second Headquarters List To 20 Possibilities

Bitcoin Plummets On Fears Of Regulatory Crackdown, Hits 4-Week Low

in Dubai

ENERGY, PROCESS/UTILITIES, OILGAS

ARCHITECTURE,ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION

CULTURAL HERITAGE ARCHAEOLOGY

3D Printing Technologies 3D Printing Materials

3D LASER SCANNERS FOR REVERSE ENGINEERING (RE) / QUALITY CONTROL (QC)

On-demand low volume manufacturing of metal parts

D2M Solutions Becomes Middle East Reseller for Desktop Metal

IN THE MIDDLE EAST REGION IN OFFERING END-TO-END DESIGN TO MANUFACTURING SOLUTIONS

NEW STRATASYS F123 SERIES 3D PRINTERS

IN UAE, SAUDI ARABIA & WIDER MIDDLE EAST

D2M Solutions FZE, based in Dubai is Stratasys Gold Partner and supplies a full range of Stratasys 3D printers according to

PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) is a strategic business approach that applies a consistent set of business solutions in

Reverse Engineering or 3D digitization is the recovery of a physical objects geometrical structures with the use of 3D laser

D2M Solutions is Unique in the Middle East region in offering complete end-to-end design to manufacturing solutions for new product development.Read More

D2M Solutions can help you to optimize your Design to Manufacture process and bring better products to market faster – Watch our corporate video to get the latest on our revolutionary technologies and the solutions we offer.

New Stratasys 3D Printing Solution for Eyewear Aims to Get Frames to Market One Year Faster

D2M Solutions Becomes Middle East Reseller for Desktop Metal

D2M partner Creaform launches SmartDENT 3D, a powerful aircraft surface inspection software

Over the last two years, we have received amazing support from D2M Solutions technical support team. We have been continuously impressed by their professionalism and the speed at which they assist us every time we face issues. They always provide us with the best fit solutions. Due to the high-level of support, we can see the extra value that D2M brings to

Mr. Ahmad Ayesh, Design and Engineering SupportMidwest Oilfield Services, Oman

D2M has grown rapidly in recent years, providing unparalleled services in a challenging market. Without D2M, it would have been very difficult to introduce PLM technologies to Saudi Arabia. We share the same vision and we work together to make such technology accessible to all manufacturing sectors in Saudi Arabia

Director of Badir AMIRiyadh, Saudi Arabia

We are very happy with the great support we receive from D2M Solutions. Our relationship is beyond a normal sales relationship. It is a partnership which we expressed recently by inviting D2M to our event Shukran, (thank you)

Mr. Yasser Al-HamidiTexas A & M University,Qatar

Robobeast 3D Printer

home,page,page-id-14468,page-template,page-template-full_width,page-template-full_width-php,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.5.1,vc_responsive

Locally designed, manufactured & supported.

TheRoboBeastis a robust 3D printer without compromise. Built by South Africans because nothing else was good enough, this beast of a machine is now available and ready for action!

Being South African is like boldly swimming against the shoal; the small guy who doesnt always have the clout but sure has the courage. We are a bit rugged but mighty tough. We are the ones who adapt quickly and never give up, the ones who try the hardest, surprises, but never compromises, because in order to succeed in the global market we have to be better than the rest and sharper than the best.

And that is why South Africans work harder and always punch above their weight. Eish! Lekker! Kief!

The RoboBeast 3D printers are true South Africans.No. 5 Corner Minis