RepRap professional manufacture

Complementary product prices and freight charges

3D Printer Filament ABS material 1kg

he3d prusa EI3 single 3D printer kit full metal extruder

reprap 3d printer X, Y, Z, E,extruder stepper motor NEMA17

The reprap 3d printer nozzle cleaning special drill

DIY reprap 3d Open source Ciclop 3d scanner kit for 3d printer

The 3D printer reprap dedicated 608 bearings

K200 single head delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

Reprappro Mendel Huxley3D printer pure copper nozzle

10Pcs/lot 100K HE3D NTC 100K Thermistors with cable

Free shipping melzi LCD 12864 To upgrade the LCD

Free shipping Reprap 3d printer Melzi Version 2.0

The reprap 3d printer filament holder

Dual Z axis upgrade set parts for HE3D EI3 3d printer

he3d EI3 triple 3D printer kit-Multi material support

He3D prusa ei3 dual full metal extruder 3d printer kit

2Pcs E3D Kraken Nozzle Throat Fine Finishing Version For 1.75mm

Free shipping Fully Completed Assembly RAMPS1.4 Controller Board

He3D E3D hot end metal extruder for ei3 dual

DIY reprap 3d Open source Ciclop 3d scanner kit for 3d printer

he3d prusa EI3 single 3D printer kit full metal extruder

He3D prusa ei3 dual full metal extruder 3d printer kit

he3d EI3 triple 3D printer kit-Multi material support

K200 single head delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

K200 dual heads delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

K280 the bigger delta 3d printer kit- support multi material

He3D H500 3D printer kit-end stop filament

3d printer dedicated thermistor 100 k

3D printer hot end components in stainless steel connector

This 3D printer creates human muscles and tissues that could actually replace real ones

Your browser does not support HTML5 video.

Were getting closer to the plug-and-play human body.

Researchers at Wake Forest University in North Carolina say they have created a 3D printer that can produce organs, tissues, and bones that could theoretically be implanted into living humans. The groups workwas publishedin the scientific journal Nature Biotechnology today.

According to the paper, the researchers printer acts much like most 3D printers do, using a computer-controlled nozzle to extrude layers of materials in a very precise pattern. The layers eventually harden to produce whatever youre trying to print. But unlike with most printers, which put down layers of molten plastic or metal, Wake Forests printer lays down what are called hydrogelswater-based solutions containing human cells. The universitys printer has multiple nozzles, some extruding hydrogels, others biodegradable materials that are used to give the tissue its printing structure and strength. When the supporting materials dissolve and tissue finishes incubating in the machine, it could be potentially implanted into a person.

The researchers ran three-dimensional scans on human ears, jawbones and muscles to create digital templates for their printer. They then printed out an ear-shaped piece of cartilage, a muscle, and a piece of a jawbone, and implanted them in mice. The structure of the universitys printer allows it to print out tissues that can accommodate blood vessels, meaning they can receive the oxygen and nutrients that cells need to survive. This has been a sticking point for many of the 3D printers that have tried to print living tissue in the past. According to the paper, the schools printed products showed no signs of necrosis, or cells dying in the tissue.

Future development of the integrated tissue-organ printer is being directed to the production of tissues for human applications, and to the building of more complex tissues and solid organs, lead researcher Anthony Atala told Quartz. When printing human tissues and organs, of course, we need to make sure the cells survive, and function is the final test. Our research indicates the feasibility of printing bone, muscle, and cartilage for patients. We will be using similar strategies to print solid organs.

Its worth noting that the Wake Forest researchers arent the only ones researching bioprinting like this. Todd Goldstein, a researcher at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, told Quartz that this isnt completely novel. Goldstein iscurrently working on3D printing human cells to use in implantable tracheas. But he said the researchs true novelties lie in the fact that its combined the entire process into one machine, and the quality of the results its getting. He suggested thinking of it this way: If you have a really good baker that can come up with an amazing seven-layer cakehe has no new ingredients, but the way they put it together made it taste really good.

A Philadelphia-based startup, BioBots, released a $10,000 3D printer in September thatprints human tissue. The companys CEO, Danny Cabrera told Quartz that Atala is on BioBots scientific advisory board. Nothings totally different here, Cabrera said, the main difference is that this one has four heads.

While its becomeincreasingly apparentthat 3D printing hasnt proven overly useful for the average consumer, its showing real promise in other areas. The first 3D-printed drug was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administrationlast August, and doctors in Spain managed to successfully install a 3D-printedtitanium ribcageon a patient in September. It remains to be seen whether Wake Forests printed organsor anyone elseswill be tested on actual humans anytime soon. The researchers said in their paper that their technology would require further development before its organs could be tested on a human. The US FDA previously told Quartz that it has not approved any 3D printers for any internal human use, but it has significant scientific interest in this topic.

The logical conclusion of bioprinting research, if found safe sand reliable, could well be to dramatically reduce the wait-time for transplants, and perhaps even replace humans healthy organs with even better ones. Its something that Martine Rothblatt, the founder of SiriusXM, isalso trying to solve. Rothblatt has to my knowledge a perfect track record in making [her] visions real, Google futurist Ray Kurzweil told theWashington Post. But for now, and for the near future, thetens of thousandsof people waiting for a transplant will just have to keep hoping their number is up next.

PDF Printer

WinXp,Win2000,Win2003,WinVista,Win 7

doPDF(PDFת) v9.0.220 ԰

BullZip PDF Printer(ӡ) v11.4.0.2674

pdfתexcelת v6.5 Ѱ

PDF༭(Foxit PDF Editor) v2.2.1.1119

G9200ˢ Port.No.6.0 ȫ ŻϷ ȶʡ

G9280ˢ Full S8 Port.No.5.0 ȫ ԴŻ ŻϷ

N9200ˢ V36.0 ȫֲS8 ˽ģʽ֧ ݸ

G9350 ROM V29.0 ȫֲ ֲNOTE8Ӧ ȶʡ

G9280ˢ Full S8 Port.No.3.2 ϵͳ ȶ

G9350 ROM V28.0 ݸ ȥϵͳ ȶʡ

վṩϴ޷֤û⣬Ӵ⣬ǣ

صֵ֧(IEͼ)Ѹ(Ѹͼ)ֱӵٶ̫볢Եص㣬ļ̫ʹøΪȷصļʹãʹWinRARѹվ

ҽԴصļڰװʱÿһ360ȫʿQQԹܼʾעѡ

վԴߡͶѼҵӯĿľʹãһԼԴԴغ24ʱɾ

վԴȫ߻ṩϷתԸϷ̳ϷվȫΪѷַİȨϵDzȨ֤վ촦ɾٱϵ߾ٱ صԴ޷أ뱾վͷԱϵ

ֵҵӪ֤: B2-20070004 -ICP08105208 062

DEM TECHNOLOGIES (HK) COLIMITED-DEM PRINTER RIBBONTONERINKJET

HITACHI HT 580-2,NCR 5886 ATM RIBBON

TallyGenicom 256110-104,6800,6600 Cartridge ribbon

Printronix 255049-102,255048-402,255050-402,P8000,P7000 Cartridge Ribbon

Olivetti PR2,Olivetti PR2 Plus,Nantian PR2,PR2 Plus ribbon cartridge

Compuprint PRK6287-6/SP40 Plus,SP40+ ribbon cartridge

TallyGenicom 256110-104,255661-103,255661-102,255661-101 T6800,T6600

Printronix 255049-103,256976-403,P8000,P7000 Cartridge Ribbon

TallyGenicom 255661-102,255670-402,6800,6600 Cartridge ribbon

Tally T5040,TallyGenicom T5040,Tally 043393 Ribbon

TallyGenicom 255661-104,6800,6600 Cartridge ribbon

TallyGenicom 256112-104,6800,6600 Cartridge ribbon

TallyGenicom 255661-103,255670-403 6800,6600 Cartridge ribbon

WINCOR NIXDORF HPR4915/HPR4915+/HPR4915xe/HPR4915 Plus/HPR4920 ribbon cartridge

Printronix 255049-104,256976-404,P8000,P7000,N7000 Cartridge Ribbon

HomeProduct CatalogPrinter RibbonLine PrinterPrinter TonerCopier TonerPrinter InkjetContact UsSitemapMobile Version

Tel:+86 755 2793 5815Fax:+86 755 2747 3140Mobile:+86 Email:kype:daermei Wechat:deminkjetWhatsApp:+86

Declare: Our company brand products sell to domestic user, neutral or white box pack products can face foreign customer sell

All brand property right that trade mark belong to its holder, make prove use only. Our company, printer and originally consumptive material manufacturer are not any related

Blink and Youll Miss How Fast This Souped-Up 3-D Printer Makes Prototypes

Whats up in emerging technology

Whats up in emerging technology

Blink and Youll Miss How Fast This Souped-Up 3-D Printer Makes Prototypes

The video in this article hasnt been sped up. What youre watching is a new desktop 3-D printer built by MIT researchers that cranks out plastic items 10 times faster than other, similar printers. In a paper published in the journalAdditive Manufacturing, MIT professor John Hart and his graduate student Jamison Go identified why current desktop 3-D printers are so slow and presented their solutions.

Interested in exploring more about the future of 3-D printing? Check out our webinar on 3-D printing in manufacturing today at 2pm Eastern.Register hereits free!

The main reasons printing takes so long, they found, have to do with the speed at which the mechanism moves while forming the item, the force applied to the material coming through the printer, and the low heating capacity of the machines. Their machine improves on these issues using a laser, a specialized screw, and a high-speed gantry. The screw mechanism increases the force on the polymer material by an order of magnitude, pushing it through the printers nozzle while the laser rapidly heats the material.

By combining this with a quick-moving mechanism that guides the placement of the plastic, the researchers created a hot rod of a 3-D printer. If I can get a prototype part, maybe a bracket or a gear, in five to 10 minutes rather than an hour, or a bigger part over my lunch break rather than the next day, I can engineer, build, and test faster, Hart says.

Hart is known for bringing speed to 3-D printing. Desktop Metal, the company he cofounded and one ourSmartest Companies of 2017, will be launching commercial printers next year that increase the speed of metal 3-D printing 100-fold (see The 3-D Printer That Could Finally Change Manufacturing).

The remaining issue with their technology is that at the speed at which it prints, the plastic is often still molten as the machine moves on to lay the next layer of plastic on the top of it. This can cause distortion in the part. The team is working on a way to cool the object during the printing process.

President Donald Trumpapproveda plan to enact tariffs on imported solar cells and modules, committing an unforced error that promises to raise the price on one of the most promising renewable energy sources.

Circling the wagons:The move was precipitatedRead more

President Donald Trumpapproveda plan to enact tariffs on imported solar cells and modules, committing an unforced error that promises to raise the price on one of the most promising renewable energy sources.

Circling the wagons:The move was precipitated by two struggling solar panel manufacturers who petitioned the International Trade Commission last year to enact the protections. They argued US producers were being unfairly harmed by the influx of cheap photovoltaics, particularly those arriving directly or indirectly from China. In late October, ITCs commissioners recommended the president impose import limits and tariffs.

Anti-competitve:The tariffs appear to be a clear-cut case of protectionism, propping up a US industry that Chinese rivals have out-competed in the marketplace. Chinas solar sector has been instrumental in driving down the cost of panels, bringing the cost of solar energy neck and neck with fossil fuels (at least before you take into account the inherent intermittency and storage challenges associated with solar).

Bottom line:The Solar Energy Industries Association previouslywarnedthe tariffs could double the price of solar panels, and eliminate tens of thousands of jobs. They will kick in after nations exceed certain volumes, and start at 30 percent in the first year, then fall 5 percent per year for the next three years.

Subscribe and get the bimonthly magazine and unlimited access to online articles.

An artificial synapse could make brain-on-a-chip hardware a reality

Background:Neuromorphic computer chips are designed to work like the human brain. Instead of being controlled by binary, on-or-off signals like most current chips, neuromorphic chips weight their outputs, mimicking the way different neurons fire atRead more

Background:Neuromorphic computer chips are designed to work like the human brain. Instead of being controlled by binary, on-or-off signals like most current chips, neuromorphic chips weight their outputs, mimicking the way different neurons fire at different strengths through their synapses.

Whats new:Artificial synapses have proved tricky to create. ButMIT researchersnow say they can precisely control one that can be used to train neural networks. Whats more, theyve used the design to build a chip of synapses, and theyve found that its able to recognize handwriting samples with 95 percent accuracy.

What it means:Artificial neural networks are already loosely modeled on the brain. The combination of neural nets and neuromorphic chips could let AI systems be packed into smaller devices and runa lot more efficiently.

Studies have found that ships have a net cooling effect on the planet, despite belching out nearly a billion tons of carbon dioxide each year. Thats almost entirely because they also emit sulfur, which can scatter sunlight in the atmosphere and form…

Studies have found that ships have a net cooling effect on the planet, despite belching out nearly a billion tons of carbon dioxide each year. Thats almost entirely because they also emit sulfur, which can scatter sunlight in the atmosphere and form or thicken clouds that reflect it away.

Besides entrepreneurs and investors, hackers are also cashing in on initial coin offerings.

The news:Professional services firm Ernst & Young examined 372 ICOs andfoundthat roughly $400 million of $3.7 billion raised so far has fallen into the handsRead more

Besides entrepreneurs and investors, hackers are also cashing in on initial coin offerings.

The news:Professional services firm Ernst & Young examined 372 ICOs andfoundthat roughly $400 million of $3.7 billion raised so far has fallen into the hands of cybercriminals. (See What the Hell Is an Initial Coin Offering?)

The significance:The finding likely adds fuel to the already-intensifying scrutiny of ICOs by regulators and lawmakers.China and South Korea have banned the practice, and more countries could follow suit. In the US, the Securities and Exchange Commission has warned investors to watch out for scams, and it recently halted two ICOs for violating laws meant to protect investors.

The show continues:As regulators wrestle with the novel fund-raising approach, the ICO bonanza shows no signs of stopping. Encrypted messaging service Telegram recently announced thatit intends to raise $2 billion in an upcoming offering.

Subscribe to Chain Letter, our twice-weekly newsletter focused on cryptocurrencies and blockchains. Its free!

The company nowsayssocial media may hurt civic discourse, but it promises to do its moral duty by understanding how to mitigate such problems.

What it says:Of the thousands of words published in apairof newessayson the topic, the choicest cutRead more

The company nowsayssocial media may hurt civic discourse, but it promises to do its moral duty by understanding how to mitigate such problems.

What it says:Of the thousands of words published in apairof newessayson the topic, the choicest cut comes from Facebooks product manager for civic engagement, Samidh Chakrabarti:

If theres one fundamental truth about social medias impact on democracy its that it amplifies human intent both good and bad.I wish I could guarantee that the positives are destined to outweigh the negatives, but I cant.

Why it matters:Its another sign, along with a commitmentto build a more meaningful social network, that Facebook is responding to criticism about fake news, Russian meddling, and addictive content.

Now what?Chakrabarti says the company has a moral duty to understand how [its] technologies are being used and what can be done to make Facebook as representative, civil and trustworthy as possible.

A new report from the World Economic Forum says 1.4 million US jobs will be hit by automation between now and 2026but training could ease the losses.

Limited options:Without reeducation,says the WEF, 16 percent of affected workers will have no jobRead more

A new report from the World Economic Forum says 1.4 million US jobs will be hit by automation between now and 2026but training could ease the losses.

Limited options:Without reeducation,says the WEF, 16 percent of affected workers will have no job prospects. A further 25 percent would have one to three job options available to them. Thats in line withpredictions from McKinsey last yearthat automation could force 375 million people to switch careers by 2030.

How to help:With two years of training, the WEF predicts, 95 percent of at-risk workers would find a new job, with an average salary increase of $15,000.

But:That will require 70 percent of displaced workers to retrain for a completely new career. Training would ideally be paired with programs like job matching and income support to help workers through the transition.

A new report says at least 86 people have had their genes edited in China to help cure disease.

Backstory:We already knew that China hadexperimented with CRISPR gene editing in humans since 2016, becoming the first nation in the world to do so. But Read more

A new report says at least 86 people have had their genes edited in China to help cure disease.

Backstory:We already knew that China hadexperimented with CRISPR gene editing in humans since 2016, becoming the first nation in the world to do so. Butno human CRISPR trials have so far taken place in America.

Whats new:Aninvestigation by theWall Street Journalsays that CRISPR gene editing has actually been used in Chinese hospitals to treat human diseases like cancer since 2015. The new report shows the extent of the trend.

How its possible:Unlike the US, China allows a hospitals ethics committee to approve research on humans. CRISPR trials can be approved within an afternoon.

But:The push to use the technique isnt necessarily a good idea. There are still safety concerns about such treatments, fromimmune reactionstounintended edits.

In the shadow of Amazons offices in downtown Seattle, people enter a tiny grocery store, take whatever they want, and then walk out. And nobody runs after them screaming.

This is what its like to shop atAmazon Go, the online retail giants vision for…

In the shadow of Amazons offices in downtown Seattle, people enter a tiny grocery store, take whatever they want, and then walk out. And nobody runs after them screaming.

A team at the University of Glasgow reported inScienceThursday that they have madea series of 3-D printable reaction vessels, or reactionware, that can be used to turn simple compounds into medicines.

Why use 3-D printing?This approach will allowRead more

A team at the University of Glasgow reported inScienceThursday that they have madea series of 3-D printable reaction vessels, or reactionware, that can be used to turn simple compounds into medicines.

Why use 3-D printing?This approach will allow the on-demand production of chemicals and drugs that are in short supply, hard to make at big facilities, and allow customization to tailor them to the application, says Leroy Cronin, one of the papers authors.

The benefit:Printable tools could encourage drug makers to create medicines for rare diseases that would be too costly to manufacture using conventional methods.

The risk:The reactionware might also be used for ill deeds, like synthesizing illegal drugs. Butas with 3-D printed guns, its likely still more trouble than its worth.

A new analysis of global science and engineering competence shows that the United States is struggling to fight off an increasingly competitive China.

The numbers:According to the National Science Foundation, China published over 426,000 research papersRead more

A new analysis of global science and engineering competence shows that the United States is struggling to fight off an increasingly competitive China.

The numbers:According to the National Science Foundation, China published over 426,000 research papers in 2016. America pumped out almost 409,000. If you consider the number of citations for those papers, a measure of the influence they have in the scientific community, America does betterit placed third internationally, while China comes in fifth (Sweden and Switzerland took the top spots).

Strengths elsewhere:The report does, however, note that America invests the most in R&D, attracts the most venture capital, and awards the most advanced degrees compared with every other nation in the world.

What it all means:In a statement, Maria Zuber, vice president for research at MIT, says that this all shows Americas lead is decreasing in certain areas that are important to our country. She adds that the trend raises concerns about impacts on our economy and workforce, and has implications for our national security.

The mission of MIT Technology Review is to equip its audiences with the intelligence to understand a world shaped by technology.

MIT Technology Review © 2018v.ei

The 3-D Printer That Could Finally Change Manufacturing

We noticed youre browsing in private or incognito mode.

To continue reading this article, please exit incognito mode orlog in.

Not an Insider? Subscribe now for unlimited access to online articles.

Visitors are allowed 3 free articles per month (without a subscription), and private browsing prevents us from counting how many stories youve read. We hope you understand, and considersubscribingfor unlimited online access.

The 3-D Printer That Could Finally Change Manufacturing

Desktop Metal thinks its machines will give designers and manufacturers a practical and affordable way to print metal parts.

One of Desktop Metals 3-D printers makes a part out of a steel alloy, demonstrating its ability to churn out complex structures.

Its less than two months before his companys initial product launch, and CEO Ric Fulop is excitedly showing off rows of stripped-down 3-D printers, several bulky microwave furnaces, and assorted small metal objects on a table for display. Behind a closed door, a team of industrial designers sit around a shared work desk, each facing a large screen. The wall behind them is papered with various possible looks for the startups ambitious products: 3-D printers that can fabricate metal parts cheaply and quickly enough to make the technology practical for widespread use in product design and manufacturing.

The company, Desktop Metal, has raised nearly $100 million from leading venture capital firms and the venture units of such companies as General Electric, BMW, and Alphabet. The founders include four prominent MIT professors, including the head of the schools department of materials science and Emanuel Sachs, who filed one of the original patents on 3-D printing in 1989. Still, despite all the money and expertise, theres no guarantee the company will succeed in its goal of reinventing how we make metal partsand thus transforming much of manufacturing.

As Fulop moves about the large, open workspace, his excitement and enthusiasm seem tempered by anxiety. The final commercial printers are not yet ready. Employees are busy tinkering with the machines, and fabricated test objects are scattered about. Progress is being made, but its also obvious that the clock is ticking. In a corner near the front door and entrance area, the floor is empty and taped off; soon the space needs to be filled with a mockup of the companys planned booth for an upcoming trade show.

If it succeeds, Desktop Metal will help solve a daunting challenge that has eluded developers of 3-D printing for more than three decades, severely limiting the technologys impact. Indeed, despite considerable fanfare and evangelical enthusiasts, 3-D printing has, in many ways, been a disappointment.

Hobbyists and self-proclaimed makers can use relatively inexpensive 3-D printers to make wonderfully complex and ingenious shapes out of plastics. And some designers and engineers have found those machines useful in mocking up potential products, but printing polymer parts has found little use on the production floor in anything but a few specialized products, such as customized hearing aids and dental implants.

3-D-print metals, doing so is difficult and pricey.

Though it is possible to 3-D-print metals, doing so is difficult and pricey. Advanced manufacturing companies such as GE are using very expensive machines with specialized high-power lasers to make a few high-value parts (see Additive Manufacturing inour 10 Breakthrough Technologies list of 2013). But printing metals is limited to companies with millions to spend on the equipment, facilities to power the lasers, and highly trained technicians to run it all. And there is still no readily available option for those who want to print various iterations of a metal part during the process of product design and development.

A hydraulic manifold is processed inside a microwave furnace, which uses temperatures up to 1,400 C to sinter the steel part. Such a part is too complex to make with conventional methods.

The shortcomings of 3-D printing mean the vision that has long excited its advocates remains elusive. They would like to create a digital design, print out prototypes that they could test and refine, and then use the digital file of the optimized version to create a commercial product or part out of the same material whenever they hit make on a 3-D printer. Having an affordable and fast way to print metal parts would be an important step in making this vision a reality.

Were about to kill a massive, accidental experiment in reducing global warming

The tricks propagandists use to beat science

Trumps solar tariffs shoot US clean energy in the foot

Bitcoin and Ethereum have a hidden power structure, and its just been revealed

AI Is Continuing Its Assault on Radiologists

It would give designers more freedom, allowing them to create and test parts and devices with complex shapes that cant be made easily with any other production methodsay, an intricate aluminum lattice or a metal object with internal cavities. It could eventually enable engineers and materials scientists to create parts with new functions and properties by depositing various combinations of materialsfor example, printing out a magnetic metal next to a nonmagnetic one. Beyond that, it would redefine the economics of mass production, because the cost of printing something would be the same regardless of how many items were produced. That would change how manufacturers think about the size of factories, the need for backup inventory (why keep many parts in stock if you can simply and quickly print one out?), and the process of tailoring manufacturing to specialized products.

This is why there has been a race to turn 3-D printing into a new way to produce parts. Longtime suppliers of 3-D printers, including Stratasys and 3D Systems, are introducing increasingly advanced machines that are fast enough for manufacturers to use. Last year, HP introduced a line of 3-D printers that the company says will allow manufacturers to prototype and make products with nylon, a widely used thermoplastic. And last fall, GE spent over a billion dollars on a pair of European companies specializing in 3-D-printing of metal parts.

This steel propeller has just been printed. Between the propellers blades and the metal support is a thin line of ceramic, which will turn to sand during the sintering process, allowing the finished part to be easily separated from the support.

The propeller after processing provides an example of a high-performance part that can be made with 3-D printing. Engineers can use the method to prototype and optimize different designs.

But the real competition for Desktop Metal is probably not from the growing number of companies in 3-D printing. For one thing, the 3-D printers from HP, Stratasys (an investor in Desktop Metal), and 3D Systems mainly use various types of plastics, not the range of metals Fulops company wants to use in its printers. And GEs high-end machines overlap little with Desktop Metals market ambitions. Instead, the real competitors for Desktop Metal are more likely to be established metal-processing technologies. Those include automated machining techniquessuch as the method used to make the ultra-thin aluminum back casing of iPhonesand a rapidly growing practice called metal injection molding, a common way to mass-produce metal products.

One of the original 3-D-printing companies, Stratasys was founded by Scott Crumb, the inventor of fused deposition modeling, the most common way to print plastic parts.

Sells machines that can print a variety of photopolymer and thermoplastic materials.

This Silicon Valley startup has developed a novel photochemical process for fabricating parts out of various plastics, including polyurethane and epoxy.

Introduced a modular system for manufacturers this spring.

Its line of machines exploits the companys long history with ink-jet printing through what it calls multi jet fusion technology. This uses multiple nozzles for high-speed and high-resolution printing.

Introduced its first 3-D printers last year. The initial machines print nylon, but the company is looking to expand to other materials.

The first 3-D-printing company, 3D Systems was founded by Chuck Hull, the inventor of stereolithography, which uses light to form parts out of photopolymers. It now offers various types of 3-D printers, including some that print metal parts.

In other words, rather than merely trying to outdo other 3-D printers, Desktop Metal will have the tough task of converting manufacturers away from production methods that are at the heart of their businesses. But the very existence of this large, established market is what makes the prospect so intriguing. Making metal parts, says Fulop, is a trillion-dollar industry. And even if 3-D printing wins only a small portion of it, he adds, it could still represent a multibillion-dollar opportunity.

Look around. Metals are everywhere. But whereas 3-D printing has been widely used in making plastics, the technologys use in making metal parts has been narrowly confined, says Chris Schuh, head of materials science and engineering at MIT and cofounder of Desktop Metal. Metal processing is more of an art. Its a very challenging space.

Making metal objects using 3-D printing is difficult for several reasons. Most obvious is the high temperature required for processing metals. The most common way to print plastics involves heating polymers and squirting the material out the printer nozzle; the plastic then quickly hardens into the desired shape. The process is simple enough to be used in 3-D printers that sell for around $1,000. But building a 3-D printer that directly extrudes metals is not practical, given that aluminum melts at 660 C, high-carbon steel at 1,370 C, and titanium at 1,668 C. Metal parts also have to go through several high-temperature processes to ensure the expected strength and other mechanical properties.

To make a 3-D printer fast enough to be used in manufacturing metal objects, Desktop Metal turned to a technology that dates back to the late 1980s. Thats when a team of MIT engineers led by company cofounder Sachs filed a patent for three-dimensional printing techniques. It described a process of putting down a thin layer of metal powder and then using ink-jet printing to deposit a liquid that selectively binds the powder together. The process, which is repeated for hundreds or thousands of layers to define a metal part, can make ones with nearly unlimited geometric complexity. In the most common application of the technology, the binder acts like a glue. However, it can also be used to locally deposit different materials in different locations.

The MIT researchers knew their printing method could be used to make metal and ceramic parts, says Sachs. But they also knew it was too slow to be practical, and the metal powders required for the process were far too expensive at the time. Sachs turned to other research interests, including an effort to improve the manufacturing of photovoltaics (seePraying for an Energy Miracle,). In the next decades 3-D printing took off and captured the imagination of many product designers. Most famously, a cheap and easy-to-use 3-D printer from MakerBot was introduced in 2009, appealing to many self-styled inventors and tinkerers. But these affordable printers bumped up against the reality that they were limited to using a few cheap plastics. Whats more, though the machines can print complex shapes, the final product often isnt as good as a plastic part made with conventional technology.

Meanwhile, researchers at industrial manufacturers like GE were busy advancing laser-based technologies invented in the late 1980s for printing metals. These machines use lasersor, in some cases, high-power electron beamsto draw shapes in a layer of metal powder by melting the material. They repeat the process to build up a three-dimensional object out of the fused powders. The technique is impressive in its capabilities, but its slow and expensive. It is worthwhile only for extremely high-value parts that are too complex to make using other methods. Notably, GEs new jet engine uses a series of sophisticated 3-D-printed fuel nozzles; they are lighter and far more durable because intricate cooling channels have been built into them.

The founders of Desktop Metal decided that to make 3-D metal printing more widely accessible, they would need to sell two different types of machines: a relatively inexpensive desktop model suitable for designers and engineers fabricating prototypes, and one that is fast and large enough for manufacturers. Luckily, several innovations have finally made Sachss original invention practical for mass production, including the development of very high-speed ink-jet printing for depositing the binder. Successively printing about 1,500 layers, each 50 micrometers thick and deposited in a few seconds, the production-scale printer can build up a 500-cubic-inch part in an hour. Thats about 100 times faster than a laser-based 3-D printer can make metal parts.

For its prototyping machine, Desktop Metal adopted a method from plastic-based 3-D printing. But instead of a softened polymer, it uses metal powders mixed with a flowable polymer binder. The formulation is extruded, using the printed binder to clump the metal powder into the intended shapes.

However, whether the part is printed with the prototyping machine or the production model, the resulting objectpart plastic binder and part metallacks the strength of a metal one. So it goes into a specially designed microwave oven for sintering, a process of using heat to make the material more dense, producing a part with the desired properties. In a series of carefully calibrated steps during the sintering process, the polymer is burned off, and then the metal is fused together at a temperature well below its melting point.

According to the promises of its enthusiasts, 3-D printing will reduce the need for industrial manufacturers and empower local artisan producers (seeThe Difference Between Makers and Manufacturers,). The reality is likely to be far different but nonetheless profound. Many sectors of industrial production increasingly use automation and advanced software, and 3-D printing enhances this ongoing move to digital manufacturing. In some ways, it is not unlike an automated machining process that works off a digital file to create a metal part. Whats different about 3-D printing is that it offers ways to make far more complex objects and removes many of the constraints that the production process puts on designers and engineers.

Despite the allure of apps and social media, todays digital technologies are doing little to generate the kind of prosperity that previous generations enjoyed, a prominent economist argues. But that doesnt mean we should give up on innovation.

It could also inspire manufacturers to change their logistics and production strategies. For relatively small quantities of goods, 3-D printing could be cheaper, since it eliminates the costs associated with the tooling, casting, and molds required to churn out most metal and plastic objects. The time and money needed to set all that up is one reason why mass production is often required if a manufacturer is going to make money. Without that incentive to commit to mass-scale production, factories could shift production schedules and be more responsive to demand, moving even closer to just-in-time manufacturing. John Hart, a professor of mechanical engineering at MIT and cofounder of Desktop Metal, calls it customized mass production. Rather than having large facilities make a huge number of identical parts that have to be shipped across the world and warehoused, manufacturers might maintain scattered factories that make a diverse set of products, ramping up production as needed. The implications in a decade or two are probably beyond our imagination, Hart says. I dont really think we know what we will do with these technologies.

For now, the challenge for Desktop Metal is to get its equipment in the hands of designers and engineers who are responsible for their companies next generation of products. This winter Fulop was preparing to showcase the companys initial product, the prototyping machine, at a trade show in Pittsburgh in early May. (The production 3-D printer is scheduled to be available next year.) His task would be to convince attendees that spending $120,000 on Desktop Metals prototyping printer and sintering furnace is essential for the future of their companies.

One of the key advantages of 3-D printing is its ability to make complex structures, including internal lattices in a metal part. Such structures could be used to make ­lighter and stronger parts.

It is a sales job that Fulop is well suited for. He has started more than a half-dozen companies, beginning with one that imported computer hardware and software that he founded when he was 16 and still living in his native Venezuela. He is probably best known for founding A123 Systems, a battery company that was one of the highest-flying startups in the late 2000s, culminating with a $371 million IPO in 2009. The company was based on a novel lithium-ion technology developed by Yet-Ming Chiang, an MIT professor who is also a cofounder of Desktop Metal. Like their current 3-D-printing startup, A123 hoped to apply materials science expertise to revolutionize a huge market.

It could also inspire manufacturers to change their logistics and production strategies.

Though A123 enjoyed rapid growth and a highly successful IPO, the company declared bankruptcy in 2012 (Fulop left in 2010).Ask Fulop the lesson from A123 and he says simply: Batteries are a low-margin market. Indeed, A123 struggled to compete in an increasingly crowded battery business, and it didnt offer a radical enough performance improvement over established lithium-ion batteries to immediately win over a fledging hybrid-vehicles market (seeA123s Technology Just Wasnt Good Enough).

The challenges faced by Desktop Metal will be very different. A huge market for metal parts already exists. And the startup believes its technology will, at least in the short run, have few direct competitors. Chiang points to the startups really rich patent portfolio. Its not just the materials; its the techniques, its the [sintering] furnace, he says. The harder the technology is, the higher the barrier to entry you build if youre successful.

In his office, Chiang has a wooden box containing a half-dozen swords, on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, that were made in the 1970s using traditional Japanese techniques. Chiang uses the swords in teaching. The lesson: how the craftsmen used the secrets of metallurgy to turn iron ore into the final productan ultra-sharp, slightly curved steel sword. Showing off the swords, Chiang points to some of their details, explaining the tricks their makers used, such as the quenching method used to create an extremely hard edge and a softer body. Back at his desk, his attention again on Desktop Metal, hes equally enthusiastic as he describes the metal objects recently printed by the company and on display at its facilities. Whats exciting is the idea that you can really make these parts, Chiang says. A few hours, and heres a part that you couldnt even make before.

It wont replace such century-old production techniques as forging and metal casting, but 3-D printing could create new possibilities in manufacturingand, just maybe, reimagine the art of metallurgy.

Become an Insider to get the story behind the story and before anyone else.

A hydraulic manifold is processed inside a microwave furnace, which uses temperatures up to 1,400 C to sinter the steel part. Such a part is too complex to make with conventional methods.

This steel propeller has just been printed. Between the propellers blades and the metal support is a thin line of ceramic, which will turn to sand during the sintering process, allowing the finished part to be easily separated from the support.

The propeller after processing provides an example of a high-performance part that can be made with 3-D printing. Engineers can use the method to prototype and optimize different designs.

Desktop Metal printed the bolt and wing nut separately to demonstrate that it can fabricate parts with tight tolerances.

One of the key advantages of 3-D printing is its ability to make complex structures, including internal lattices in a metal part. Such structures could be used to make ­lighter and stronger parts.

3-D printingAdditive Manufacturingprototype

As the editor ofMIT Technology Review, I spend much of my time thinking about the types of stories and journalism that will be most valuable to our readers. What do curious, well-informed readers need to know about emerging technologies? As aMorewriter, I am particularly interested these days in the intersection of chemistry, materials science, energy, manufacturing, and economics.

Please read ourcommenting guidelines.

Business of Blockchain 2017 – Opening Remarks

Were about to kill a massive, accidental experiment in reducing global warming

The tricks propagandists use to beat science

Trumps solar tariffs shoot US clean energy in the foot

Bitcoin and Ethereum have a hidden power structure, and its just been revealed

AI Is Continuing Its Assault on Radiologists

How technology advances are changing the economy and providing new opportunities in many industries.

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 20, 2018

This weeks most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

by Emerging Technology from the arXiv

The fastest-growing business app is relying on machine-learning tricks to fend off a deluge of messagesas well as competition from Facebook and Microsoft.

This weeks most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

by Emerging Technology from the arXiv

The Bridge to Digital Transformation: The Move to a Software-Based Network Strategy

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe to Insider Plus.

! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !

Everything included in Insider Basic, plus the digital magazine, extensive archive, ad-free web experience, and discounts to partner offerings and MIT Technology Review events.

Unlimited 24/7 access toMIT Technology Reviews website

The Download:our daily newsletter of whats important in technology and innovation

Bimonthly print magazine (6 issues per year)

Access to the magazine PDF archivethousands of articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips

Discount toMIT Technology Reviewevents

Special discounts to select partner offerings

Revert to MIT Enterprise Forum pricing

The mission of MIT Technology Review is to equip its audiences with the intelligence to understand a world shaped by technology.

MIT Technology Review © 2018v.ei

of three free articles this month.Subscribe nowfor unlimited online access.

Subscribe nowfor unlimited online access.

This is your last free article this month.

Subscribe nowfor unlimited online access.

Youve read all your free articles this month.

Subscribe nowfor unlimited online access.

Log infor more, orsubscribe nowfor unlimited online access.

Log infor two more free articles, orsubscribe now

3 d printer

to get e-mail alerts and updates on your eBay Feed.

Unfollow3 d printerto stop getting updates on your eBay Feed.

Youll receive email and Feed alerts when new items arrive.

Congo, Democratic Republic of the – COD

Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) – FLK

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines – VCT

Tarantula i3 3D Printer Kit /SD-Card Reader / USB 2.0 & 2 Rolls Filament Bundle

2018 Newest 3D Printer Factory Direct Lowest Price modular design orange

Newest 3D Printer kit TEVO Tarantula I3 3d printing 2 Roll Filament As Gift

3D Printer kit Standard TEVO Tarantula I3 Aluminium Extrusion 3d printing

3D Printer Wanhao Model D5S Large Build Commercial Quality NEW ARRIVAL HOT SALE

Tarantula DUAL-HEAD 3D Printer Kit w/SD-Card/Auto

2018 a8 3d Printer DIY i3 upgradest High Precision Reprap 3d Desktop Printer DHL

Support ABS/PLA/HIPS! Professional 3d Printer! de DHL shipping!

Black Widow 3D Printer Kit W/ Auto-Leveling / SD Card Reader & USB-2 Kit Bundle

BLTouch Auto-Leveling Sensor with wiring harness !!!

2016 Pro Avatar IV 3D Printer/Printi

Mini Extruder Anti-Jam Queen 3D Printing Prima

3D Printer Creality CR-10 DIY Kit 300*300*400mm Print Size 1.75mm 0.4mm Nozzle

3D Printer Big Printing Size Prusa i4 High Accurancy 2Rolls FreeFilament+S

Tarantula i3 DUAL-HEAD 3D Printer Modification Kit

Newest I3 3D Printer Metal Kit Heated Bed auto-level heated bed Diy warehouse

free gifts ,easy to assemble,one year warranty sd cards

3D Printer Printing Wanhao Duplicator i3 All Metal Construction Graphics Display

3D Printer Finder Flashforge 3D Printing Single Extruder w/ Leveling Assistance

Flashforge Dreamer 3D Printer Dual Extruder Support ABS PLA and WIFI USB SD Card

Customs services and international tracking provided

Professional ANYCUBIC Acrylic Prusai3 3D Printer DIY KIT Large Print Size w/ PLA

NEW!!! CR-10 DIY 3D Printer Kit 300*300*400mm Printing Size 1.75mm 0.4mm Nozzle

Tarantula 3D Printer Kit w/FLEX/auto-le

vel/Large Bed/SD/2 Roll Filament Bundle

CTC FDM – Black Makerbot Replicator 2 3D-Printer -2 Extruders + 1 PLA filament

Geeetech Mini 3D Printer G2S Delta Rostock Dual Extruder Auto Level DIY Kossel

Tarantula 3D Printer Kit w/FLEX/Large Bed/SD-Reader/

DIY 3D Printer Acrylic Print 5 Materials Geeetech Prusa Reprap I3 LCD Filament

NEW Black Monoprice Select Mini 3D Printer

Customs services and international tracking provided

Geeetech 3D Printer G2 New Mini Prusa Delta Rostock DIY Auto Level Unassembled

LMYSTAR 3D Printer Economic Price Printing Machine

Upgarded Aluminium Cube 3D Printer Kits Tronxy X5 High Precision 210*210*280mm

Geeetech DIY 3D Printer I3 Pro New Acrylic Plate Print Prusa Reprap ABS/ PLA

Monoprice Select Mini 3D Printer with Heated Build Plate, Includes Micro SD Card

Customs services and international tracking provided

Customs services and international tracking provided

WANHAO DUPLICATOR i3 3D PRINTER – MK10 EXTRUDER – BRAND NEW 2016 V2.1 MODEL

FACTORY DIRECT LOWEST PRICE FREE UK AND EU SHIPPING

2018 off duty 3d printer reprap prusa i3 3d printer DIY kit-tax free

Tarantula DUAL-HEAD 3D Printer Kit w/SD-Card Reader / 2 Roll Filament Bundle

Geeetech DIY 3D Printer I3 Dual Extruder Acrylic Pro C Support 5 Materials+1xPL

2018 Newest 3D Printer Factory Direct Lowest Price modular design assemble

DIY Self-Assembly Auto Leveling 3D Printer High Precision Acrylic Frame i3

RU WarehouseTechnology Support0.25kg Filament

DIY Assembled X5 3D Printer Big Size Aluminium Frame High Precision 3D Printing

Free Fast ShippingTechnology Support Send Gift

Geeetech 3d printer kit Full Acrylic I3 Pro X Reprap Prusa I3 unassembled kit

Support 6 material, with assemble video!

ANYCUBIC 3D Printer Kit Prusa i3 Self-assembly Large Printing Size 210210250mm

3D Printer Kit Desktop Hero Delta DIY MiNi High Precision Printer SD Card USB

2018 The Best QIDI TECH FDM 3D Printer with high quality upgraded motherboard

Large Size 3D Printer Upgraded High Precision 10-150mm/s 3D Machine +Filament

TEVO DELTA LITTLE MONSTER 3D PRINTER DIY KIT – ENORMOUS 500HX340DIA PRINT AREA!!

Desktop Hero Delta 3D Printer DIY Kit High Precision Printing SD Card 3 Colors

ANYCUBIC 3D Printer Kit Upgrade I3 Mega Full Metal Frame Industrial DIY Printing

Tronxy X5 3D Printer Aluminium Structure 210*210*280mm High Precision DIY Assemb

Aluminium Structure✔Technology Support✔Free Shipping✔X5

Geeetech Kossel Delta Rostock G2 RepRap Full 3D Printer kit Auto Level

free shipping! Support 4 types filament!

WANHAO DUPLICATOR 6 – D6 – DESKTOP 3D PRINTER – FACTORY DIRECT – UK SUPPORT

FACTORY DIRECT LOWEST PRICE FREE UK AND EU SHIPPING

eBay determines this price through a machine learned model of the products sale prices within the last 90 days.

eBay determines trending price through a machine learned model of the products sale prices within the last 90 days. New refers to a brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item, and Used refers to an item that has been used previously.

Copyright © 1995-2018 eBay Inc. All Rights Reserved.AccessibilityUser AgreementPrivacyCookiesandAdChoice

Norton Secured – powered by Verisign

This page was last updated: Jan-31 10:51. Number of bids and bid amounts may be slightly out of date. See each listing for international shipping options and costs.

Glowforge

Tell us the email you purchased with and well send you a password reset link.

Make magical things at the push of a button.

The biggest 30-day crowdfunding campaign in history

Personalized hardwood skin for Macbook Pro

Personalized hardwood skin for Macbook Pro

Drone with dual rubberband gatling guns

Drone with dual rubberband gatling guns

Built on Laser Cutter/Engraver Technology

Glowforge uses a beam of light the width of a human hair to cut, engrave, and shape designs from a variety of materials

12 revolutionary features that give you creative laser superpowers

Glowforges onboard cameras can cut & engrave directly over top of your drawing. From a doodle to a diagram to a masterpiece, youre one button away from a finished product. Or, scan drawings and resize, clone, personalize & edit them right in Glowforge software.

The camera shows the actual material on the Glowforge bed so you can drag around your design with your mouse or finger. Align it perfectly & see what it will look like before you hit print.

The lens moves as the laser travels, so you can cut & engrave materials that are curved, uneven, or irregular. Glowforges dual cameras measure the thickness of the material to a precision of four one thousandths of an inch.

Glowforges cameras recognize a variety of specially-coded materials, plus your iPhone or laptop for perfect settings without any guesswork. It also supports presets for other materials you use regularly.

Personalized designer jewelry. The perfect shoulder bag, with customizable compartments. Lighting, housewares, art, party goods, furniture – no art degree required. The Glowforge catalog lets you buy & print intricate, beautiful designs.

Work from your Mac, iPad, iPhone, Android, & Windows or Linux computer with JPG, PNG, PDF, EPS, & a host of other file types from software like Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape, Adobe Photoshop, GIMP, Autodesk, & Sketchup.

Glowforge uses a regular household outlet & connects via wifi. Cooling, fans, & everything else is built in. Use without ventilation for materials like stone & glass, or ventilate out the window for materials like acrylic & leather. Or, add a Glowforge Air Filter & cut anywhere.

The dual cameras align the laser head with the frame, with your design, and with your material. Glowforge realigns with every cut and engrave, adjusting timing and position, so every print comes out perfectly.

The laser works by removing a hairsbreadth of material, called the kerf. Glowforge knows this and compensates, so if you draw two puzzle pieces, theyll fit. Even better, the Glowforge can measure the material thickness so 3D objects slide together perfectly.

Engrave complex, three dimensional curves with 1,000 DPI resolution. To get perfect detail and sculpt with real depth, Glowforge can carve away material with multiple passes, each one focusing more deeply than the last.

Under US Food & Drug Administration regulations, Glowforge Basic is categorized as a Class 1 laser, like a DVD player, so no special precautions are required to use it. The Pro model is Class 4 device like other lasers, and requires additional precautions.

The unique Glowforge Air Filter lets you put the Glowforge anywhere, no matter what material youre cutting. It snaps right under the Glowforge and makes it just 7 taller. Its $750. Alternately, you can use the Basic model near a window with the included duct.

Use Adobe Photoshop or any JPG from your camera

Use Adobe Illustrator, free software like Inkscape, or any PDF

Export from CAD software to create complex dimensional objects

Choose a design from dozens of categories like personal electronics, jewelry, toys, furniture, leather goods, lighting, containers, art, and more.

Custom 40W (basic) / 45W (pro) laser

© 2018 Glowforge, Inc., All Rights Reserved

2200 1st Ave. South, First Floor, Seattle, WA 98134

3-D printer makes first wearable battery

Imagine printing off a wristband that charges your smartphone or electric car with cheap supplies from a local hardware store.

Thats the direction materials research is heading at Brunel University London where scientists have become the first to simply and affordably 3-D print a flexible, wearable battery.

The technique opens the way for novel designs for super-efficient, wearable power for phones, electric cars, medical implants like pacemakers and more.

The printer squirts stacks of silicone, glue and gel electrolyte pastes like a layer cake, to make what looks like a clear festivalwristband. Sandwiched inside is a supercapacitor, which stores energy like a battery, but on its surface and without chemical reactions.

This is the first time a flexible supercapacitor including all its components has been produced by 3-D printing, said Milad Areir at Brunels Cleaner Electronics Research Group. The most popular way to produce them is screen printing, but with that you cant print the frame of the supercapacitor on silicone.

Researchers in many countries have found new ways to make flexible supercapacitators. But their techniques, which include 3-D laser selective melting machines are expensive and use different machines to print different parts.

Our technique brings it all together into one process with one machine, said Milad. It will definitely save time and costs on expensive materials.

The work, published in Materials Science and Engineering, shows the power wristband can be made using cheap products from a household shop instead of sophisticated expensive metals or semiconductors. Whats more is that they stand up to stress tests without losing power.

This has developed a novel 3-D printing method for manufacturing flexible supercapacitators, by one single continuous process using low-cost flexible silicone compatible with the electrode, current collector and electrolyte materials, the study says.

A simple open-source printer connected by USB to a syringe driver with a stopper motor can print the paste layers, with only three or four syringes based on the size of the supercapacitator. The wristbands are printed in a honeycomb pattern, which means less material needs printing, so they are quicker to make. But designers can also experiment with different complex shapes.

The process is easy to copy, the study says, and shows 3-D printing using paste extrusion can be used to develop more sophisticated electronic devices with different mixes of paste.

In future it can be used for mobile phones, said Milad. For example, if the phone battery is dead, you could plug the phone into the supercapacitator wristband and it could act as a booster pack, providing enough power to get to the next charging point.

More information:Milad Areir et al. 3D printing of highly flexible supercapacitor designed for wearable energy storage,Materials Science and Engineering: B(2017).DOI: 10.1016/j.mseb.2017.09.004

E-skin for manipulating virtual objects without touching them

A small chemical reactor made via 3-D printing allows for making drugs on-demand

Biodegradable sensor monitors pressure in the body then disappears

3-D printing equipment in the field

Novel 3-D printing technique yields high-performance composites

Worlds smallest wearable device monitors UV exposure

Inkjet-printed thermite deposits energetic materials safely

Swallowable sensors reveal mysteries of human gut health

Nanoscale cryptography method gains robustness from stiction

New desalination method offers low energy alternative to purify salty water

E-skin for manipulating virtual objects without touching them

A team of researchers from Germany and Austria has developed a type of e-skin that allows a wearer to control virtual objects without touching them. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group …

A small chemical reactor made via 3-D printing allows for making drugs on-demand

A team of researchers at the University of Glasgow has developed a system based on 3-D printing reactor modules for creating pharmaceuticals on demand. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes …

Biodegradable sensor monitors pressure in the body then disappears

UConn engineers have created a biodegradable pressure sensor that could help doctors monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other medical conditions before dissolving harmlessly in a patients body.

3-D printing equipment in the field

What if our military could dramatically reduce the amount of materials and equipment held on the front lines by printing only what they need? Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory …

Novel 3-D printing technique yields high-performance composites

Nature has produced exquisite composite materialswood, bone, teeth, and shells, for examplethat combine light weight and density with desirable mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength and damage tolerance.

Worlds smallest wearable device monitors UV exposure

A Northwestern University professor, working in conjunction with the global beauty company LOral, has developed the smallest wearable device in the world. The wafer-thin, feather-light sensor can fit on a fingernail and …

Inkjet-printed thermite deposits energetic materials safely

Researchers have developed a method to deposit tiny amounts of energetic materials (explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics) using the same technology as an inkjet printer.

Swallowable sensors reveal mysteries of human gut health

Findings from the first human trials of a breakthrough gas-sensing swallowable capsule could revolutionise the way that gut disorders and diseases are prevented and diagnosed.

Nanoscale cryptography method gains robustness from stiction

Most of the cryptographic methods that keep important data secure use complex encryption software, and as a result, consume large amounts of power. As more and more electronic devices are being connected to the internet, …

New desalination method offers low energy alternative to purify salty water

Providing safer drinking water to those in need may be a little easier. According to Penn State researchers, a new desalination technique is able to remove salt from water using less energy than previous methods.

A glucose testing patch that doesnt require pricking the skin

A team of researchers from Tsinghua University working with Peoples Liberation Army Air Force General Hospital, both in China, has developed a two-stage patch that can be used to test glucose levels. In their paper published …

Metal printing offers low-cost way to make flexible, stretchable electronics

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique for directly printing metal circuits, creating flexible, stretchable electronics. The technique can use multiple metals and substrates and is …

MAGMA: Work on flapless flight is taking off with initial flight trial success

(Tech Xplore)BAE Systems and Manchester University announced completion and success of its first flight trial of the unmanned aerial vehicle, MAGMA. Further flight trials are planned for the coming months to demonstrate …

Amputee controls individual prosthetic fingers via ultrasound technology

Luke Skywalkers bionic hand is a step closer to reality for amputees in this galaxy. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created an ultrasonic sensor that allows amputees to control each of their prosthetic …

Aperture mask allows for 3-D ultrasound imaging with just one sensor

(Tech Xplore)A team of researchers from Delft University of Technology and Erasmus Medical Center, both in the Netherlands, has found a way to perform 3-D ultrasound imaging using a single sensor instead of thousands. …

New research identifies how 3-D printed metals can be both strong and ductile

A new technique by which to 3D print metals, involving a widely used stainless steel, has been show to achieve exception levels of both strength and ductility, when compared to counterparts from more conventional processes.

Pleasesign into add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute.Read more

Enter your Science X account credentials

© Tech Xplore 2014 – 2018 powered byScience X Network

CNET Special Topics

Intel halts some chip patches as the fixes cause problems

What its like inside Amazons futuristic, automated store

Facebook admits social media is bad for democracy, sometimes

Who needs prestige? Netflix ends year on a Bright note

Tractor beam breakthrough could lead to levitating humans

CNET may earn fees when you click through to a partner site.